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Gender and age interact to affect early outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage.

dc.contributor.author Gray, MC
dc.contributor.author Hailey, CE
dc.contributor.author James, Michael Lucas
dc.contributor.author Kranz, Peter George
dc.contributor.author Laskowitz, Daniel Todd
dc.contributor.author McDonagh, DL
dc.contributor.author Phillips-Bute, Barbara Gottfried
dc.contributor.author Roulhac-Wilson, B
dc.contributor.author Sun, W
dc.contributor.author Umeano, O
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2017-05-01T17:20:02Z
dc.date.available 2017-05-01T17:20:02Z
dc.date.issued 2013
dc.identifier https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24312335
dc.identifier PONE-D-13-29326
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/14238
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) is a common and devastating form of cerebrovascular disease. In ICH, gender differences in outcomes remain relatively understudied but have been examined in other neurological emergencies. Further, a potential effect of age and gender on outcomes after ICH has not been explored. This study was designed to test the hypothesis that age and gender interact to modify neurological outcomes after ICH. METHODS: Adult patients admitted with spontaneous primary supratentorial ICH from July 2007 through April 2010 were assessed via retrospective analysis of an existing stroke database at Duke University. Univariate analysis of collected variables was used to compare gender and outcome. Unfavorable outcome was defined as discharge to hospice or death. Using multivariate regression, the combined effect of age and gender on outcome after ICH was analyzed. RESULTS: In this study population, women were younger (61.1+14.5 versus 65.8+17.3 years, p=0.03) and more likely to have a history of substance abuse (35% versus 8.9%, p<0.0001) compared to men. Multivariable models demonstrated that advancing age had a greater effect on predicting discharge outcome in women compared to men (p=0.02). For younger patients, female sex was protective; however, at ages greater than 60 years, female sex was a risk factor for discharge to hospice or death. CONCLUSION: While independently associated with discharge to hospice or death after ICH, the interaction effect between gender and age demonstrated significantly stronger correlation with early outcome after ICH in a single center cohort. Prospective study is required to verify these findings.
dc.language eng
dc.relation.ispartof PLoS One
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1371/journal.pone.0081664
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject Age Factors
dc.subject Aged
dc.subject Cerebral Hemorrhage
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject Multivariate Analysis
dc.subject Neurologic Examination
dc.subject Probability
dc.subject Prognosis
dc.subject Recovery of Function
dc.subject Retrospective Studies
dc.subject Sex Factors
dc.title Gender and age interact to affect early outcome after intracerebral hemorrhage.
dc.type Journal article
pubs.author-url https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24312335
pubs.begin-page e81664
pubs.issue 11
pubs.organisational-group Anesthesiology
pubs.organisational-group Anesthesiology, Neuroanesthesia
pubs.organisational-group Basic Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke Clinical Research Institute
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Neurobiology
pubs.organisational-group Neurology
pubs.organisational-group Neurology, Neurocritical Care
pubs.organisational-group Neurosurgery
pubs.organisational-group Radiology
pubs.organisational-group Radiology, Neuroradiology
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 8
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-6203


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