Volatile abundances and oxygen isotopes in basaltic to dacitic lavas on mid-ocean ridges: The role of assimilation at spreading centers

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2011-08-07

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Abstract

Most geochemical variability in MOR basalts is consistent with low- to moderate-pressure fractional crystallization of various mantle-derived parental melts. However, our geochemical data from MOR high-silica glasses, including new volatile and oxygen isotope data, suggest that assimilation of altered crustal material plays a significant role in the petrogenesis of dacites and may be important in the formation of basaltic lavas at MOR in general. MOR high-silica andesites and dacites from diverse areas show remarkably similar major element trends, incompatible trace element enrichments, and isotopic signatures suggesting similar processes control their chemistry. In particular, very high Cl and elevated H2O concentrations and relatively light oxygen isotope ratios (~5.8‰ vs. expected values of ~6.8‰) in fresh dacite glasses can be explained by contamination of magmas from a component of ocean crust altered by hydrothermal fluids. Crystallization of silicate phases and Fe-oxides causes an increase in δ18O in residual magma, but assimilation of material initially altered at high temperatures results in lower δ18O values. The observed geochemical signatures can be explained by extreme fractional crystallization of a MOR basalt parent combined with partial melting and assimilation (AFC) of amphibole-bearing altered oceanic crust. The MOR dacitic lavas do not appear to be simply the extrusive equivalent of oceanic plagiogranites. The combination of partial melting and assimilation produces a distinct geochemical signature that includes higher incompatible trace element abundances and distinct trace element ratios relative to those observed in plagiogranites. © 2011 Elsevier B.V.

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10.1016/j.chemgeo.2011.05.017

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Wanless, VD, MR Perfit, WI Ridley, PJ Wallace, CB Grimes and EM Klein (2011). Volatile abundances and oxygen isotopes in basaltic to dacitic lavas on mid-ocean ridges: The role of assimilation at spreading centers. Chemical Geology, 287(1-2). pp. 54–65. 10.1016/j.chemgeo.2011.05.017 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/9357.

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Klein

Emily M. Klein

University Distinguished Service Professor

Dr. Klein's research focuses on the geochemistry of oceanic basalts, using diverse tools of major, trace and isotopic analyses. Her research involves sea-going expeditions to sample and map the ocean floor.


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