Frailty in the End-Stage Lung Disease or Heart Failure Patient: Implications for the Perioperative Transplant Clinician.

Abstract

The syndrome of frailty for patients undergoing heart or lung transplantation has been a recent focus for perioperative clinicians because of its association with postoperative complications and poor outcomes. Patients with end-stage cardiac or pulmonary failure may be under consideration for heart or lung transplantation along with bridging therapies such as ventricular assist device implantation or venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, respectively. Early identification of frail patients in an attempt to modify the risk of postoperative morbidity and mortality has become an important area of study over the last decade. Many quantification tools and risk prediction models for frailty have been developed but have not been evaluated extensively or standardized in the cardiothoracic transplant candidate population. Heightened awareness of frailty, coupled with a better understanding of distinct cellular mechanisms and biomarkers apart from end-stage organ disease, may play an important role in potentially reversing frailty related to organ failure. Furthermore, the clinical management of these critically ill patients may be enhanced by waitlist and postoperative physical rehabilitation and nutritional optimization.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1053/j.jvca.2018.08.002

Publication Info

Bottiger, Brandi A, Alina Nicoara, Laurie D Snyder, Paul E Wischmeyer, Jacob N Schroder, Chetan B Patel, Mani A Daneshmand, Robert N Sladen, et al. (2019). Frailty in the End-Stage Lung Disease or Heart Failure Patient: Implications for the Perioperative Transplant Clinician. Journal of cardiothoracic and vascular anesthesia, 33(5). pp. 1382–1392. 10.1053/j.jvca.2018.08.002 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/29729.

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Scholars@Duke

Bottiger

Brandi Anne Bottiger

Associate Professor of Anesthesiology

I have been a member of the Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology division and Department of anesthesiology for >10 years, caring for cardiac and thoracic surgical patients. I am the current cardiothoracic anesthesiology fellowship director of 14 fellows (https://anesthesiology.duke.edu/?page_id=818051).  My academic interests are in education, CTA content development, and specific interests in outcomes improvement after lung transplantation. Additionally, I have greatly appreciated my leadership role and ability to engage with the Duke Transplant Center.

Nicoara

Alina Nicoara

Professor of Anesthesiology
Snyder

Laurie D. Snyder

Professor of Medicine

Advanced lung disease, lung transplantation, interstitial lung disease, immune monitoring

Wischmeyer

Paul Edmund Wischmeyer

Professor of Anesthesiology

Paul Wischmeyer M.D., EDIC, FASPEN, FCCM is a nutrition, exercise, critical care, and perioperative  physician-researcher who specializes in enhancing preparation and recovery from surgery, critical care and COVID-19. He serves as a Tenured Professor of Anesthesiology and Surgery at Duke. He also serves as the Associate Vice Chair for Clinical Research in the Dept. of Anesthesiology and Director of the TPN/Nutrition Team at Duke. Dr. Wischmeyer earned his medical degree with honors at The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, where he was elected into the honor society of Alpha Omega Alpha for outstanding academic achievement. He completed his pediatric internship at University of Colorado Children’s Hospital and his anesthesiology/critical care residency training at the University of Chicago. He also completed a Clinical Pharmacology fellowship and the NIH K30 Clinical Research Scientist Training Program while at University of Chicago.
   Dr. Wischmeyer’s clinical and research focus is in critical care, perioperative care exercise, and nutrition to help patients prepare and recover from illness and surgery. His research interests include surgical and ICU nutrition and exercise rehabilitation; role of parenteral, enteral, and oral nutrition to improve patient outcomes; perioperative optimization; post-illness muscle mass and functional recovery; and probiotics/microbiome. His research interests have also recently been focused on COVID-19 research into COVID-19 metabolism, role of probiotics in COVID19 prevention and treatment, and exercise and nutrition programs to recover from COVID-19 and Long COVID-19. Dr. Wischmeyer’s research group has been awarded multiple NIH, DOD, and other peer reviewed grants to perform research ranging from basic mechanistic cell work to large-scale multi-center clinical trials in the fields of critical care, perioperative medicine, nutrition, illness metabolism, microbiome/probiotics, and exercise interventions to improve functional outcomes. For his research work and clinical work, Dr. Wischmeyer has received numerous awards from national and international societies including, The Jeffrey Silverstein Award and Memorial Lecture for Humanism in Medicine from the American Delirium Society, The John M. Kinney Award for the most significant contribution to field of general nutrition, the Stanley Dudrick Research Scholar Award by the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and The Lifetime Achievement Award of the International Parenteral Nutrition Society (IPENEMA) for significant contributions to the field of nutrition.  Dr. Wischmeyer has over 200 peer-reviewed publications in critical care, anesthesiology, and nutrition, including in the New England Journal of Medicine. Finally, he has been an invited speaker at numerous national and international medical meetings delivering over 900 invited presentations over his career. He has an H-index of 73 with over 16,500 citations to his work, including 1 publication with > 1000 citations and 55 publications with > 100 citations. He is also the founder and director of the Duke Online Clinical Nutrition Fellowship, an international fellowship to provide clinical nutrition training to healthcare providers worldwide, as well as unique scholarship opportunities for healthcare providers in developing nations.
    Dr. Wischmeyer passion for helping patients recover from illness and surgery arises from his personal experiences as both doctor and patient in the ICU. Dr. Wischmeyer has undergone over 27 major surgeries and personally experienced multiple ICU stays due to a childhood GI illness that took more than half of his intestinal tract. Thus, preparation for surgery/critical care and recovery from illness are a way of life for Dr. Wischmeyer that he is passionate about teaching his patients and other caregivers worldwide.

 

Schroder

Jacob Niall Schroder

Assistant Professor of Surgery
Ghadimi

Kamrouz Ghadimi

Associate Professor of Anesthesiology

Overview
Dr. Ghadimi is a cardiothoracic anesthesiologist, intensivist (ICU doctor), researcher, educator, and director of the clinical research unit in the Department of Anesthesiology at Duke Health. He has published over 100 peer-reviewed manuscripts, book chapters, online reviews, and editorials. His expertise involves the perioperative and intensive care management of patients undergoing cardiac and noncardiac surgery, with a special focus on the treatment of bleeding and inflammation related to shock and mechanical circulatory support and on the modification of pulmonary circulation to optimize end-organ blood flow.

Clinical Education
Dr. Ghadimi is a medical school graduate of Boston University School of Medicine, completed his internship in general surgery at the University of California Irvine Medical Center and Long Beach Veterans Affairs Medical Center and completed clinical anesthesiology residency at the Allegheny Health Network in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. He completed advanced clinical fellowship specialization in adult Critical Care Medicine (surgical focus) and Cardiothoracic Anesthesiology at the University of Pennsylvania Health System in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

Expertise
Dr. Ghadimi's expertise and instruction spans across the cardiothoracic operating rooms and cardiothoracic surgical ICU environments. His expertise includes perioperative hemostasis & thrombosis, critical care of the heart or lung transplant recipient, and critical care for the patient on mechanical circulatory support, which may include extracorporeal life support (ECMO) or ventricular assist devices/systems.

Research Education
Dr. Ghadimi is a clinical and translational researcher and holds a Master in Health Sciences (M.H.Sc.) from the Duke-NIH Clinical Research Training Program. 


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