Creating and parameterizing patient-specific deep brain stimulation pathway-activation models using the hyperdirect pathway as an example.

Abstract

Background

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established clinical therapy and computational models have played an important role in advancing the technology. Patient-specific DBS models are now common tools in both academic and industrial research, as well as clinical software systems. However, the exact methodology for creating patient-specific DBS models can vary substantially and important technical details are often missing from published reports.

Objective

Provide a detailed description of the assembly workflow and parameterization of a patient-specific DBS pathway-activation model (PAM) and predict the response of the hyperdirect pathway to clinical stimulation.

Methods

Integration of multiple software tools (e.g. COMSOL, MATLAB, FSL, NEURON, Python) enables the creation and visualization of a DBS PAM. An example DBS PAM was developed using 7T magnetic resonance imaging data from a single unilaterally implanted patient with Parkinson's disease (PD). This detailed description implements our best computational practices and most elaborate parameterization steps, as defined from over a decade of technical evolution.

Results

Pathway recruitment curves and strength-duration relationships highlight the non-linear response of axons to changes in the DBS parameter settings.

Conclusion

Parameterization of patient-specific DBS models can be highly detailed and constrained, thereby providing confidence in the simulation predictions, but at the expense of time demanding technical implementation steps. DBS PAMs represent new tools for investigating possible correlations between brain pathway activation patterns and clinical symptom modulation.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1371/journal.pone.0176132

Publication Info

Gunalan, Kabilar, Ashutosh Chaturvedi, Bryan Howell, Yuval Duchin, Scott F Lempka, Remi Patriat, Guillermo Sapiro, Noam Harel, et al. (2017). Creating and parameterizing patient-specific deep brain stimulation pathway-activation models using the hyperdirect pathway as an example. PloS one, 12(4). p. e0176132. 10.1371/journal.pone.0176132 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/23850.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Sapiro

Guillermo Sapiro

James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Guillermo Sapiro received his B.Sc. (summa cum laude), M.Sc., and Ph.D. from the Department of Electrical Engineering at the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, in 1989, 1991, and 1993 respectively. After post-doctoral research at MIT, Dr. Sapiro became Member of Technical Staff at the research facilities of HP Labs in Palo Alto, California. He was with the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Minnesota, where he held the position of Distinguished McKnight University Professor and Vincentine Hermes-Luh Chair in Electrical and Computer Engineering. Currently he is the Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. School Professor with Duke University.

G. Sapiro works on theory and applications in computer vision, computer graphics, medical imaging, image analysis, and machine learning. He has authored and co-authored over 300 papers in these areas and has written a book published by Cambridge University Press, January 2001.

G. Sapiro was awarded the Gutwirth Scholarship for Special Excellence in Graduate Studies in 1991,  the Ollendorff Fellowship for Excellence in Vision and Image Understanding Work in 1992,  the Rothschild Fellowship for Post-Doctoral Studies in 1993, the Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award in 1998,  the Presidential Early Career Awards for Scientist and Engineers (PECASE) in 1998, the National Science Foundation Career Award in 1999, and the National Security Science and Engineering Faculty Fellowship in 2010. He received the test of time award at ICCV 2011. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences on 2018.

G. Sapiro is a Fellow of IEEE and SIAM.

G. Sapiro was the founding Editor-in-Chief of the SIAM Journal on Imaging Sciences.


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