High-dose daptomycin therapy for left-sided infective endocarditis: a prospective study from the international collaboration on endocarditis.

Abstract

The use of daptomycin in Gram-positive left-sided infective endocarditis (IE) has significantly increased. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of high-dose daptomycin on the outcome of left-sided IE due to Gram-positive pathogens. This was a prospective cohort study based on 1,112 cases from the International Collaboration on Endocarditis (ICE)-Plus database and the ICE-Daptomycin Substudy database from 2008 to 2010. Among patients with left-sided IE due to Staphylococcus aureus, coagulase-negative staphylococci, and Enterococcus faecalis, we compared those treated with daptomycin (cohort A) to those treated with standard-of-care (SOC) antibiotics (cohort B). The primary outcome was in-hospital mortality. Time to clearance of bacteremia, 6-month mortality, and adverse events (AEs) ascribable to daptomycin were also assessed. There were 29 and 149 patients included in cohort A and cohort B, respectively. Baseline comorbidities did not differ between the two cohorts, except for a significantly higher prevalence of diabetes and previous episodes of IE among patients treated with daptomycin. The median daptomycin dose was 9.2 mg/kg of body weight/day. Two-thirds of the patients treated with daptomycin had failed a previous antibiotic regimen. In-hospital and 6-month mortalities were similar in the two cohorts. In cohort A, median time to clearance of methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) bacteremia was 1.0 day, irrespective of daptomycin dose, representing a significantly faster bacteremia clearance compared to SOC (1.0 versus 5.0 days; P < 0.01). Regimens with higher daptomycin doses were not associated with increased incidence of AEs. In conclusion, higher-dose daptomycin may be an effective and safe alternative to SOC in the treatment of left-sided IE due to common Gram-positive pathogens.

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1128/aac.01563-13

Publication Info

Carugati, Manuela, Arnold S Bayer, Josè M Miró, Lawrence P Park, Armenio C Guimarães, Athanasios Skoutelis, Claudio Q Fortes, Emanuele Durante-Mangoni, et al. (2013). High-dose daptomycin therapy for left-sided infective endocarditis: a prospective study from the international collaboration on endocarditis. Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy, 57(12). pp. 6213–6222. 10.1128/aac.01563-13 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/29821.

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Scholars@Duke

Carugati

Manuela Carugati

Associate Professor of Medicine
Holland

Thomas Lawrence Holland

Associate Professor of Medicine
Fowler

Vance Garrison Fowler

Florence McAlister Distinguished Professor of Medicine

Determinants of Outcome in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia
Antibacterial Resistance
Pathogenesis of Bacterial Infections
Tropical medicine/International Health

Chu

Vivian Hou Chu

Associate Professor of Medicine

Dr. Chu's clinical research is focused on staphylococci and endocarditis (IE).  She is the director of the International Collaboration on Endocarditis (ICE), a group of investigators from 78 sites in 32 countries worldwide that is dedicated to further the understanding of infective endocarditis.  The ICE database comprises > 5000 cases of endocarditis and is designed to answer questions that could not be answered from a single-center study. The current focus of this group is surgical-decision making in the treatment of endocarditis. Another major focus of Dr. Chu's research is on the relationship between oral hygiene and risk for developing infective endocarditis.


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