Splenectomy and partial splenectomy improve hematopoietic stem cell engraftment in hypersplenic mice.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2010-06

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

26
views
23
downloads

Citation Stats

Abstract

Background

Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment is delayed after transplantation in children with hypersplenism, increasing the morbidity and costs of care. Preliminary clinical data suggest that splenectomy before HSC transplantation may improve HSC engraftment, although this observation has not been tested in an animal model.

Methods

We performed total splenectomy (n = 22), partial splenectomy (n = 16), or sham laparotomy (n = 21) on erythrocyte protein 4.2 knockout mice, a murine model of hereditary spherocytosis with hypersplenism. After 10 days, we lethally irradiated the mice, transplanted 3 x 10(6) allogeneic bone marrow cells, and then assessed engraftment using serial complete blood counts. Successful engraftment was defined as recovery of hemoglobin, neutrophil, or platelet counts. We compared engraftment rate using chi(2) test and time to engraftment using Student's t test analysis, with significance defined as P < .05.

Results

Total splenectomy increased the rate of successful HSC engraftment and decreased the interval to HSC engraftment compared with controls. Similarly, partial splenectomy decreased the interval to HSC engraftment, with a nonsignificant trend toward improved overall rate of successful HSC engraftment.

Conclusion

Partial or total splenectomy before HSC transplantation improves HSC engraftment in hypersplenic mice. This model supports consideration of splenic resection in hypersplenic children requiring HSC transplantation.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2010.02.114

Publication Info

Tracy, Elisabeth T, Lindsay J Talbot, Joanne Kurtzberg and Henry E Rice (2010). Splenectomy and partial splenectomy improve hematopoietic stem cell engraftment in hypersplenic mice. Journal of pediatric surgery, 45(6). pp. 1365–1369. 10.1016/j.jpedsurg.2010.02.114 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/24613.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Tracy

Elisabeth Tomlinson Tracy

Assistant Professor of Surgery
Rice

Henry Elliot Rice

Professor of Surgery

Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.