Lower likelihood of cardiac procedures after acute coronary syndrome in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

Abstract

Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is an increasing cause of morbidity and mortality in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults; however, this population may be less likely to receive interventions during hospitalization for acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The degree to which this disparity can be attributed to poorly controlled HIV infection is unknown.In this large cohort study, we used the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) to compare rates of cardiac procedures among patients with asymptomatic HIV-infection, symptomatic acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), and uninfected adults hospitalized with ACS from 2009 to 2012. Multivariable analysis was used to compare procedure rates by HIV status, with appropriate weighting to account for NIS sampling design including stratification and hospital clustering.The dataset included 1,091,759 ACS hospitalizations, 0.35% of which (n = 3783) were in HIV-infected patients. Patients with symptomatic AIDS, asymptomatic HIV, and uninfected patients differed by sex, race, and income status. Overall rates of cardiac catheterization and revascularization were 53.3% and 37.4%, respectively. In multivariable regression, we found that relative to uninfected patients, those with symptomatic AIDS were less likely to undergo catheterization (odds ratio [OR] 0.48, confidence interval [CI] 0.43-0.55), percutaneous coronary intervention (OR 0.69, CI 0.59-0.79), and coronary artery bypass grafting (0.75, CI 0.61-0.93). No difference was seen for those with asymptomatic HIV relative to uninfected patients (OR 0.93, CI 0.81-1.07; OR 1.06, CI 0.93-1.21; OR 0.88, CI 0.72-1.06, respectively).We found that lower rates of cardiovascular procedures in HIV-infected patients were primarily driven by less frequent procedures in those with AIDS.

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Journal article

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1097/md.0000000000009849

Publication Info

Clement, Meredith E, Li Lin, Ann Marie Navar, Nwora Lance Okeke, Susanna Naggie and Pamela S Douglas (2018). Lower likelihood of cardiac procedures after acute coronary syndrome in patients with human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Medicine, 97(6). p. e9849. 10.1097/md.0000000000009849 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/26709.

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Scholars@Duke

Okeke

Nwora Lance Okeke

Associate Professor of Medicine
Naggie

Susanna Naggie

Professor of Medicine

Dr. Susanna Naggie completed her undergraduate degrees in chemical engineering and biochemistry at the University of Maryland, College Park, and her medical education at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. She conducted her internal medicine and infectious diseases fellowship training at Duke University Medical Center, where she also served as Chief Resident. She joined the faculty in the Duke School of Medicine in 2009. She is a Professor of Medicine and currently holds appointments at the Duke University School of Medicine, at the Duke Clinical Research Institute, and at the Durham Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Dr. Naggie is a clinical investigator with a focus in clinical trials in infectious diseases and translational research in HIV and liver disease. She is a standing member of the DHHS Panel on Antiretroviral Guidelines for Adults and Adolescents and the CDC/NIH/IDSA-HIVMA Opportunistic Infections Guideline. She is the Vice Dean for Clinical and Translational Research and Director for the Duke Clinical and Translational Sciences Institute.


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