Return to Sport After Shoulder Stabilization Procedures: A Criteria-Based Testing Continuum to Guide Rehabilitation and Inform Return-to-Play Decision Making.

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2022-01

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Abstract

The athlete with shoulder instability poses a unique challenge to the sports medicine team. Clinical studies support surgical intervention followed by a phased approach to rehabilitation. In the latter phases, it is important to tailor this program to the individual's specific athletic needs, which requires ongoing qualitative assessment and objective measurement. Passing a return-to-sport testing battery has been shown to decrease the risk of recurrent instability. What is lacking in the literature is a consensus for how to best measure shoulder performance when the required athletic demands are widely varied by hand dominance, sport played, and playing position. Multiple upper-extremity tests have been described in the literature, but there is no consensus on which tests should be used to direct rehabilitation and to safely return the athlete to unrestricted athletic exposure. Using available evidence, we suggest a framework for return-to-play testing that integrates traditional rehabilitation phases with performance testing and graduated sports exposure.

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Level V, expert opinion.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1016/j.asmr.2021.09.039

Publication Info

Otley, Thomas, Heather Myers, Brian C Lau and Dean C Taylor (2022). Return to Sport After Shoulder Stabilization Procedures: A Criteria-Based Testing Continuum to Guide Rehabilitation and Inform Return-to-Play Decision Making. Arthroscopy, sports medicine, and rehabilitation, 4(1). pp. e237–e246. 10.1016/j.asmr.2021.09.039 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/29950.

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Scholars@Duke

Lau

Brian Chei-Fai Lau

Assistant Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery
Taylor

Dean Curtis Taylor

Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

Dr. Dean Taylor is a Sports Medicine Orthopaedic Surgeon whose practice and research interests include shoulder instability, shoulder arthroscopy, knee ligament injuries, meniscus injuries, knee cartilage injuries, and ACL injuries in adults and children. He attended the United States Military Academy at West Point and completed his medical training and residency at Duke University. Dr. Taylor went on to be a part of the John Feagin West Point Sports Medicine Fellowship, retired from the United States Army at the rank of Colonel, and returned to Duke in 2006.


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