Successful treatment of pneumatosis intestinalis with associated pneumoperitoneum and ileus with hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

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2017-05-30

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Abstract

Pneumatosis intestinalis (PI), or the presence of air in the bowel wall, is a rare disorder that is associated with a variety of underlying diseases, including connective tissue disorders. PI presents on a spectrum from asymptomatic to bowel obstruction and acute abdomen. In general, treatment of PI consists of treating the underlying disease. Both normobaric and hyperbaric oxygen have been used to treat PI directly. Here we report a symptomatic scleroderma-related case of PI that responded clinically to hyperbaric oxygen therapy. This report adds to a growing body of literature supporting a role for hyperbaric oxygen therapy in symptomatic PI.

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10.1136/bcr-2017-219209

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Calabrese, Evan, Peter Jm Ceponis, Bruce J Derrick and Richard E Moon (2017). Successful treatment of pneumatosis intestinalis with associated pneumoperitoneum and ileus with hyperbaric oxygen therapy. BMJ case reports, 2017. pp. bcr-2017-219209–bcr-2017-219209. 10.1136/bcr-2017-219209 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/17201.

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Scholars@Duke

Calabrese

Evan Calabrese

Assistant Professor of Radiology
Derrick

Bruce James Derrick

Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine
Moon

Richard Edward Moon

Professor of Anesthesiology

Research interests include the study of cardiorespiratory function in humans during challenging clinical settings including the perioperative period, and exposure to environmental conditions such as diving and high altitude. Studies have included gas exchange during diving, the pathophysiology of high altitude and immersion pulmonary edema, the effect of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia on pulmonary function and monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Ongoing human studies include the effect of respiratory muscle training on chemosensitivity and blood gases during stressful breathing: underwater exercise.


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