The roar of the lionfishes Pterois volitans and Pterois miles.

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2017-06

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Abstract

Through the analysis of acoustic recordings of captive Pterois spp., this study has confirmed anecdotal evidence that Pterois spp. are soniferous. This report of sound production in Pterois spp. provides the foundation for future research into their specific acoustic capabilities including sound production mechanisms, the role of social behaviour and applied techniques for controlling and monitoring invasive Pterois spp. in the tropical and temperate western Atlantic Ocean.

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10.1111/jfb.13321

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Beattie, M, DP Nowacek, AK Bogdanoff, L Akins and JA Morris (2017). The roar of the lionfishes Pterois volitans and Pterois miles. J Fish Biol, 90(6). pp. 2488–2495. 10.1111/jfb.13321 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/15814.

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Scholars@Duke

Nowacek

Douglas Nowacek

Randolph K. Repass and Sally-Christine Rodgers University Distinguished Professor of Conservation Technology in Environment and Engineering

Sound propagates very efficiently through sea water, and marine mammals take advantage of this medium to communicate and explore their environment. My research is focused on the link between acoustic and motor behavior in marine mammals, primarily cetaceans and manatees, specifically, how they use sound in ecological processes. The cetaceans, or whales and dolphins, are divided into two main groups, the toothed whales (odontocetes) and the baleen whales (mysticetes). One of my specific areas of research is the use of echolocation and foraging behavior in one of the odontocetes, the bottlenose dolphin. Another focus of my current research is the effect(s) of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals.


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