Postponing the dynamical transition density using competing interactions

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2020-08-01

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Abstract

Systems of dense spheres interacting through very short-ranged attraction are known from theory, simulations and colloidal experiments to exhibit dynamical reentrance. Their liquid state can thus be fluidized at higher densities than possible in systems with pure repulsion or with long-ranged attraction. A recent mean-field, infinite-dimensional calculation predicts that the dynamical arrest of the fluid can be further delayed by adding a longer-ranged repulsive contribution to the short-ranged attraction. We examine this proposal by performing extensive numerical simulations in a three-dimensional system. We first find the short-ranged attraction parameters necessary to achieve the densest liquid state, and then explore the parameter space for an additional longer-ranged repulsion that could further enhance reentrance. In the family of systems studied, no significant (within numerical accuracy) delay of the dynamical arrest is observed beyond what is already achieved by the short-ranged attraction. Possible explanations are discussed.

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10.1007/s10035-020-0998-z

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Charbonneau, P, and J Kundu (2020). Postponing the dynamical transition density using competing interactions. Granular Matter, 22(3). 10.1007/s10035-020-0998-z Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/24988.

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Charbonneau

Patrick Charbonneau

Professor of Chemistry

Professor Charbonneau studies soft matter. His work combines theory and simulation to understand the glass problem, protein crystallization, microphase formation, and colloidal assembly in external fields.


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