Effects of neuronal PIK3C3/Vps34 deletion on autophagy and beyond.

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2010-08

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Abstract

PIK3C3/Vps34 plays important roles in the endocytic and autophagic pathways, both of which are essential for maintaining neuronal integrity. However, it is unclear how inactivating PIK3C3 may affect neuronal endosomal versus autophagic processes in vivo. We generated a conditional null allele of the Pik3c3 gene in mouse, and specifically deleted it in postmitotic sensory neurons. Subsequent analyses reveal several interesting and surprising findings.

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Scholars@Duke

Wang

Fan Wang

Adjunct Professor in the Department of Neurobiology

My lab studies neural circuit basis of sensory perception. 
Specifically we are interested in determining neural circuits underlying (1) active touch sensation including tactile processing stream and motor control of touch sensors on the face; (2) pain sensation including both sensory-discriminative and affective aspects of pain; and (3) general anesthesia including the active pain-suppression process. We use a combination of genetic, viral, electrophysiology, and in vivo imaging (in free-moving animals) techniques to study these questions.


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