Surfactant protein A is defective in abrogating inflammation in asthma.

Abstract

Surfactant protein A (SP-A) regulates a variety of immune cell functions. We determined the ability of SP-A derived from normal and asthmatic subjects to modulate the inflammatory response elicited by Mycoplasma pneumoniae, a pathogen known to exacerbate asthma. Fourteen asthmatic and 10 normal control subjects underwent bronchoscopy with airway brushing and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL). Total SP-A was extracted from BAL. The ratio of SP-A1 to total SP-A (SP-A1/SP-A) and the binding of total SP-A to M. pneumoniae membranes were determined. Airway epithelial cells from subjects were exposed to either normal or asthmatic SP-A before exposure to M. pneumoniae. IL-8 protein and MUC5AC mRNA were measured. Total BAL SP-A concentration did not differ between groups, but the percentage SP-A1 was significantly increased in BAL of asthmatic compared with normal subjects. SP-A1/SP-A significantly correlated with maximum binding of total SP-A to M. pneumoniae, but only in asthma. SP-A derived from asthmatic subjects did not significantly attenuate IL-8 and MUC5AC in the setting of M. pneumoniae infection compared with SP-A derived from normal subjects. We conclude that SP-A derived from asthmatic subjects does not abrogate inflammation effectively, and this dysfunction may be modulated by SP-A1/SP-A.

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1152/ajplung.00381.2010

Publication Info

Wang, Ying, Dennis R Voelker, Njira L Lugogo, Guirong Wang, Joanna Floros, Jennifer L Ingram, Hong Wei Chu, Tony D Church, et al. (2011). Surfactant protein A is defective in abrogating inflammation in asthma. American journal of physiology. Lung cellular and molecular physiology, 301(4). pp. L598–L606. 10.1152/ajplung.00381.2010 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25440.

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Scholars@Duke

Lugogo

Njira Lucia Lugogo

Adjunct Assistant Professor in the Department of Medicine

My research focus is asthma. I perform clinical trials in asthma and I am interested in working on new therapies for patients with severe asthma.  I am also interested in the role of obesity on asthma phenotypes and biomarkers.

Ingram

Jennifer Leigh Ingram

Associate Professor in Medicine

Dr. Ingram's research interests focus on the study of airway remodeling in human asthma. Proliferation, migration, and invasion of airway fibroblasts are key features of airway remodeling that contribute to diminished lung function over time. Dr. Ingram uses molecular biology approaches to define the effects of interleukin-13 (IL-13), a cytokine abundantly produced in the asthmatic airway, in the human airway fibroblast. She has identified important regulatory functions of several proteins prevalent in asthma that control fibroblast growth and pro-fibrotic growth factor production in response to IL-13. By understanding these pathways and their role in human asthma and the chronic effects of airway remodeling, novel treatment strategies may be developed.

Kraft

Monica Kraft

Adjunct Professor in the Department of Medicine

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