Decorrelation of the static and dynamic length scales in hard-sphere glass formers.

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2013-04

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Abstract

We show that, in the equilibrium phase of glass-forming hard-sphere fluids in three dimensions, the static length scales tentatively associated with the dynamical slowdown and the dynamical length characterizing spatial heterogeneities in the dynamics unambiguously decorrelate. The former grow at a much slower rate than the latter when density increases. This observation is valid for the dynamical range that is accessible to computer simulations, which roughly corresponds to that accessible in colloidal experiments. We also find that, in this same range, no one-to-one correspondence between relaxation time and point-to-set correlation length exists. These results point to the coexistence of several relaxation mechanisms in the dynamically accessible regime of three-dimensional hard-sphere glass formers.

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10.1103/PhysRevE.87.042305

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Charbonneau, Patrick, and Gilles Tarjus (2013). Decorrelation of the static and dynamic length scales in hard-sphere glass formers. Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys, 87(4). p. 042305. 10.1103/PhysRevE.87.042305 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12612.

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Charbonneau

Patrick Charbonneau

Professor of Chemistry

Professor Charbonneau studies soft matter. His work combines theory and simulation to understand the glass problem, protein crystallization, microphase formation, and colloidal assembly in external fields.


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