Road Traffic Injury Prevention Initiatives: A Systematic Review and Metasummary of Effectiveness in Low and Middle Income Countries.

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2016

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: Road traffic injuries (RTIs) are a growing but neglected global health crisis, requiring effective prevention to promote sustainable safety. Low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) share a disproportionately high burden with 90% of the world's road traffic deaths, and where RTIs are escalating due to rapid urbanization and motorization. Although several studies have assessed the effectiveness of a specific intervention, no systematic reviews have been conducted summarizing the effectiveness of RTI prevention initiatives specifically performed in LMIC settings; this study will help fill this gap. METHODS: In accordance with PRISMA guidelines we searched the electronic databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, Scopus, Web of Science, TRID, Lilacs, Scielo and Global Health. Articles were eligible if they considered RTI prevention in LMICs by evaluating a prevention-related intervention with outcome measures of crash, RTI, or death. In addition, a reference and citation analysis was conducted as well as a data quality assessment. A qualitative metasummary approach was used for data analysis and effect sizes were calculated to quantify the magnitude of emerging themes. RESULTS: Of the 8560 articles from the literature search, 18 articles from 11 LMICs fit the eligibility and inclusion criteria. Of these studies, four were from Sub-Saharan Africa, ten from Latin America and the Caribbean, one from the Middle East, and three from Asia. Half of the studies focused specifically on legislation, while the others focused on speed control measures, educational interventions, enforcement, road improvement, community programs, or a multifaceted intervention. CONCLUSION: Legislation was the most common intervention evaluated with the best outcomes when combined with strong enforcement initiatives or as part of a multifaceted approach. Because speed control is crucial to crash and injury prevention, road improvement interventions in LMIC settings should carefully consider how the impact of improvements will affect speed and traffic flow. Further road traffic injury prevention interventions should be performed in LMICs with patient-centered outcomes in order to guide injury prevention in these complex settings.

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10.1371/journal.pone.0144971

Publication Info

Staton, C, J Vissoci, E Gong, N Toomey, R Wafula, J Abdelgadir, Y Zhou, C Liu, et al. (2016). Road Traffic Injury Prevention Initiatives: A Systematic Review and Metasummary of Effectiveness in Low and Middle Income Countries. PLoS One, 11(1). p. e0144971. 10.1371/journal.pone.0144971 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11620.

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Scholars@Duke

Staton

Catherine Ann Staton

Associate Professor of Emergency Medicine

Catherine Staton MD MSc

Dr. Staton is an Associate Professor in Emergency Medicine (EM), Neurosurgery & Global Health with tenure at Duke University. She is the Director of the GEMINI (Global EM Innovation & Implementation) Research Center and the EM Vice Chair of Research Strategy & Faculty Development. Her research integrates innovative implementation methods into health systems globally to improve access to acute care. In 2012, with an injury registry at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Center, Tanzania Dr. Staton demonstrated 30% of injury patients had at risk alcohol use, providing preliminary data for a K01/Career Development Award. Her K01 award adapted a brief alcohol intervention to the KCMC ED and Swahili and is now being trialed in an NIAAA funded R01 pragmatic adaptive clinical trial. Dr. Staton and her mentor and collaborator Dr. Mmbaga are co-PD of the “The TReCK Program: Trauma Research Capacity Building in Kilimanjaro” to train 12 masters and doctoral learners to conduct innovative implementation and data science projects to improve care for injury patients. Currently, Dr. Staton and GEMINI partners with over a dozen faculty from over 6 low- and middle-income countries to conduct research, has mentored over 150 learners from undergraduate to post-doctoral levels from high, middle and low- income settings and has over 130 manuscripts.

Vissoci

Joao Ricardo Nickenig Vissoci

Assistant Professor in Emergency Medicine

Joao Ricardo Nickenig Vissoci, MSc, PhD is an Assistant Professor of Emergency Medicine, Neurosurgery and Global Health. He is the Chief of the Division of Translational Health Sciences in the Department of Emergency Medicine, co-Director of the Global Emergency Medicine Innovation and Implementation (GEMINI) Research Center and a faculty member of the Research Design and Analysis Core (RDAC) in the Duke Global Health Institute. Dr. Vissoci has a background in social psychology and data science. Dr. Vissoci, a Brazilian native, earned a bachelor’s degree in Psychology from State University of Maringá/Brazil, a Masters in Physical Education, an MBA in Human Resources, and a PhD in Social Psychology. During his PhD, he completed a fellowship in Data Science at Duke University. After graduating his PhD in Social Psychology from the Pontificia Universidade Católica of São Paulo/Brazil, Dr. Vissoci completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Sao Paulo (2015) in Design and Analysis for Mental Health research. He completed a second postdoctoral fellowship at the Duke Global Health Institute in Global Health and Data Science in 2016. Dr. Vissoci held a faculty position and taught Public Health and Health Sciences in Brazil from 2009 to 2015. After completing his fellowship at DGHI, he joined the Duke Department of Emergency Medicine as faculty in 2017. In his last 14 years as faculty (2009-current), he has mentored over 200 trainees at all levels of training from undergraduate, graduate, medical education, postdoctoral to faculty level. He has published over 200 manuscripts and collaborated on over 6 R-level NIH grants, multiple (K and D) NIH training grants, other federal grants UK/Brazil based, and foundational grants.


His research interests focus on leveraging data through analytics and technology to bridge the gap in access and equity in care in low resource settings, translating evidence into practice or policy impact. He uses data science and mixed-methods research to design and implement innovative data-driven solutions to address health care gaps.

Von Isenburg

Megan Von Isenburg

Prof Library Staff

Megan is Associate Dean for Library Services & Archives at the School of Medicine. Megan is responsible for planning and implementing high quality information services and resources to support the missions of Duke Health. She provides leadership for the Duke University Medical Center Library, which serves as a resource library for the state of North Carolina and the Mid-Atlantic region and is known for its innovations in health sciences librarianship and expertise in evidence-based practice. Von Isenburg also oversees the retention and preservation of institutional records through Medical Center Archives services. In addition to providing access to administrative records, the Archives capture the history of Duke Medicine through its record retention services.


Graduate Certificate in e-Learning, North Carolina State University (2011)
MSLS Library Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2004)
BA, American Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (1997)

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