An ocean sensor for measuring the seawater electrochemical response of 8 metals referenced to zinc, for determining ocean pH.

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2016-03-21

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Abstract

© 2015 IEEE.We describe the use of a multi-metal electrochemical cell for measuring ocean pH. The sensor was designed to be robust, inexpensive, and capable of 0.02 sensitivity to pH in the narrow ranges required for marine pH monitoring. A prototype sensor has undergone an extended ocean deployment with promising results.

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10.1109/ICSensT.2015.7438381

Scholars@Duke

Brooke

Martin A. Brooke

Associate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Martin A. Brooke received the B.E. (Elect.) Degree (1st. Class Hons.) from Auckland University in New Zealand in 1981. He received the M.S. and Ph. D. in Electrical Engineering from The University of Southern California in 1984, and 1988, respectively. He is currently an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at Duke University. Professor Brooke was an Analog Devices Career development award recipient from 1988-1993, won a National Science Foundation Research Initiation Award in 1990, the 1992 IEEE Midwest Symposium on Circuits and Systems, Myril B. Reed Best Paper Award, and the Georgia Tech Outstanding Thesis Advisor Award in 2003. He has graduated twenty three PhD students from his research group and has eight U.S. patents awarded. He has published more than 160 articles in technical Journals and Proceedings, and articles on his work have appeared in several trade and news publications. Dr. Brooke is a senior member of the IEEE.

Nowacek

Douglas Nowacek

Randolph K. Repass and Sally-Christine Rodgers University Distinguished Professor of Conservation Technology in Environment and Engineering

Sound propagates very efficiently through sea water, and marine mammals take advantage of this medium to communicate and explore their environment. My research is focused on the link between acoustic and motor behavior in marine mammals, primarily cetaceans and manatees, specifically, how they use sound in ecological processes. The cetaceans, or whales and dolphins, are divided into two main groups, the toothed whales (odontocetes) and the baleen whales (mysticetes). One of my specific areas of research is the use of echolocation and foraging behavior in one of the odontocetes, the bottlenose dolphin. Another focus of my current research is the effect(s) of anthropogenic noise on marine mammals.


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