Cognitive Function: Is There More to Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation Than Stroke?

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2015-08-03

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10.1161/JAHA.114.001573

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Cao, Lin, Sean D Pokorney, Kathleen Hayden, Kathleen Welsh-Bohmer and L Kristin Newby (2015). Cognitive Function: Is There More to Anticoagulation in Atrial Fibrillation Than Stroke?. J Am Heart Assoc, 4(8). p. e001573. 10.1161/JAHA.114.001573 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12506.

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Scholars@Duke

Pokorney

Sean Pokorney

Assistant Professor of Medicine
Welsh-Bohmer

Kathleen Anne Welsh-Bohmer

Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Dr. Kathleen Welsh-Bohmer is a Professor of Psychiatry with a secondary appointment in the Department of Neurology.   

Clinically trained as a neuropsychologist, Dr. Welsh-Bohmer's research activities have been focused around developing effective prevention and treatment strategies to delay the onset of cognitive disorders occurring in later life.  From 2006 through 2018 she directed the Joseph and Kathleen Bryan Alzheimer’s Center in the Department of Neurology. She also oversaw the neuropsychology scientific operations of a ground-breaking Phase III global clinical trial to delay the onset of early clinical symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease entitled the “TOMMORROW” study (Takeda Pharmaceutical Company funded) which concluded in 2018.

Currently, she directs the Alzheimer's disease therapeutic area within the Duke Clinical Research Institute and she collaborates actively with VeraSci, a Durham based company, to develop reliable digital cognitive and functional assessment tools of early Alzheimer's disease and related dementias.  The methods her team is developing are informed by advances in neuroscience and technology and fill an information void in early pre-clinical Alzheimer's disease. Her work has implications for clinical practice and for the acceleration of global clinical trials aimed at the prevention of Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.


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