Emotion dysregulation and drinking to cope as predictors and consequences of alcohol-involved sexual assault: examination of short-term and long-term risk.

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2015-02

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Abstract

The present study examined emotion dysregulation, coping drinking motives, and alcohol-related problems as predictors and consequences of alcohol-involved sexual assault (AISA). A convenience sample of 424 college women completed confidential surveys on paper and online. Data were collected at baseline (T1), weekly for 10 weeks (T2-10), and at 1 year (T11). The cross-sectional and longitudinal associations among variables were examined in a cross-lagged panel model. Within each time point, all variables were correlated. Drinking to cope and emotion dysregulation predicted AISA in the short term (within 10 weeks), alcohol problems increased risk for AISA in the long term (within 1 year), and AISA history predicted AISA revictimization regardless of time frame. Drinking to cope and alcohol-related problems predicted future victimization, but their impact seems to fluctuate over time. Coping drinking motives were both a predictor and consequence of AISA, suggesting a cyclical pattern. However, additional analyses indicated that coping drinking motives and alcohol problems might act as suppressors in the model. Overall, findings indicate that interventions focused on improving emotion regulation skills may decrease short-term risk for AISA.

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10.1177/0886260514535259

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Messman-Moore, Terri, Rose Marie Ward, Noga Zerubavel, Rachel B Chandley and Sarah N Barton (2015). Emotion dysregulation and drinking to cope as predictors and consequences of alcohol-involved sexual assault: examination of short-term and long-term risk. J Interpers Violence, 30(4). pp. 601–621. 10.1177/0886260514535259 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11246.

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Zerubavel

Noga Zerubavel

Assistant Consulting Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Noga Zerubavel, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist and Assistant Consulting Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center, where she is involved in clinical education and research. She is involved in Trauma-informed Teaching and Learning in Education research project, supervises in Duke Family Studies, and participates in teaching for the clinical psychology predoctoral internship program. She is the former director of the Stress, Trauma, and Recovery Treatment (START) Clinic at Duke, where she led a trauma consultation team and supervised psychiatry residents and clinical psychology interns and fellows in trauma-informed psychotherapy. Dr. Zerubavel specializes in treatment of trauma survivors using empirically supported treatments, with an emphasis on contemporary CBTs and mindfulness-based psychotherapy. She also has expertise in addressing burnout and secondary traumatic stress, and individual and organizational practices for enhancing wellness and resilience. Dr. Zerubavel is active in providing trainings for mental health providers, social service administrators, and physicians and other health care providers.


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