Cannabis use is associated with potentially heritable widespread changes in autism candidate gene <i>DLGAP2</i> DNA methylation in sperm.

Abstract

Parental cannabis use has been associated with adverse neurodevelopmental outcomes in offspring, but how such phenotypes are transmitted is largely unknown. Using reduced representation bisulphite sequencing (RRBS), we recently demonstrated that cannabis use is associated with widespread DNA methylation changes in human and rat sperm. Discs-Large Associated Protein 2 (DLGAP2), involved in synapse organization, neuronal signaling, and strongly implicated in autism, exhibited significant hypomethylation (p < 0.05) at 17 CpG sites in human sperm. We successfully validated the differential methylation present in DLGAP2 for nine CpG sites located in intron seven (p < 0.05) using quantitative bisulphite pyrosequencing. Intron 7 DNA methylation and DLGAP2 expression in human conceptal brain tissue were inversely correlated (p < 0.01). Adult male rats exposed to delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) showed differential DNA methylation at Dlgap2 in sperm (p < 0.03), as did the nucleus accumbens of rats whose fathers were exposed to THC prior to conception (p < 0.05). Altogether, these results warrant further investigation into the effects of preconception cannabis use in males and the potential effects on subsequent generations.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1080/15592294.2019.1656158

Publication Info

Schrott, Rose, Kelly Acharya, Nilda Itchon-Ramos, Andrew B Hawkey, Erica Pippen, John T Mitchell, Scott H Kollins, Edward D Levin, et al. (2020). Cannabis use is associated with potentially heritable widespread changes in autism candidate gene DLGAP2 DNA methylation in sperm. Epigenetics, 15(1-2). pp. 161–173. 10.1080/15592294.2019.1656158 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/28271.

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