Transition Space Distance Learning

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Date

2019

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Abstract

The notion of distance plays and important role in many reinforcement learning (RL) techniques. This role may be explicit, as in some non-parametric approaches, or it may be implicit in the architecture of the feature space. The ability to learn distance functions tailored for RL tasks could, thus, benefit many different RL paradigms. While several approaches to learning distance functions from data do exist, they are frequently intended for use in clustering or classification tasks and typically do not take into account the inherent structure present in trajectories sampled from RL environments. For those that do, this structure is generally used to define a similarity between states rather than to represent the mechanics of the domain. Based on the idea that a good distance function in such a domain would reflect the number of transitions necessary to get to from one state to another, we detail an approach to learning distance functions which accounts for the nature of state transitions in a Markov decision process, including their inherent directionality. We then present the results of experiments performed in multiple RL environments in order to demonstrate the benefit of learning such distance functions.

Type

Master's thesis

Department

Computer Science

Description

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Subjects

Artificial intelligence, Computer science, Distance learning, Feature extraction, Reinforcement learning

Citation

Citation

Nemecek, Mark William (2019). Transition Space Distance Learning. Master's thesis, Duke University. Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18849.

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