Frequency and causes of QRS prolongation during exercise electrocardiogram testing in biventricular paced patients with heart failure.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1016/j.hrcr.2020.02.006

Publication Info

Atwater, Brett D, Kasper Emerek, Zak Loring, Christoffer Polcwiartek, Kevin P Jackson and Daniel J Friedman (2020). Frequency and causes of QRS prolongation during exercise electrocardiogram testing in biventricular paced patients with heart failure. HeartRhythm case reports, 6(6). pp. 308–312. 10.1016/j.hrcr.2020.02.006 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/25533.

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Scholars@Duke

Loring

Zak Loring

Assistant Professor of Medicine

I am a cardiac electrophysiologist specializing in the treatment of heart rhythm disorders and management of cardiac implantable electronic devices (CIEDs). My research utilizes signal processing of electrocardiographic data and novel analytic techniques to better phenotype patients and identify those for whom interventional electrophysiology procedures may be most beneficial. This includes predicting which patients with left bundle branch block may benefit from early cardiac resynchronization therapy or conduction system pacing. I also analyze population level data to identify patients at high risk for adverse sequelae of rhythm disorders who may benefit from early intervention.

Jackson

Kevin Patrick Jackson

Associate Professor of Medicine

Research interests include:
- optimization of device timing for Cardiac Resynchronzation Therapy (CRT)
- novel cardiac imaging technologies for CRT
- catheter ablation versus anti-arrhythmic drug for treatment of atrial fibrillation.


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