The meanings associated with medicines in heart failure patients.

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2012-05

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Abstract

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to explore the theoretical linkages between symptom experiences and meaning associated with medication adherence. The specific objectives were to evaluate the key constructs of Meaning-Response theory for understanding medication adherence in patients with chronic heart failure; to assess the influence of symptom persistence on the meaning associated with prescribed medicines; and to explore the extent to which meaningful associations improve medication adherence. Among patients with heart failure, poor medication adherence occurs in over half of the population, resulting in high rates of symptom exacerbation, avoidable hospitalization, and death. Nurses play a key role in facilitating self-management skills, but patients' perceptions of the relationship between symptoms and medicines is not clear. METHODS: Using a prospective mixed methods design, the study assessed patients' (n=10) perception of chronic heart failure symptoms and medication adherence. Patients completed guided interviews related to six concepts of meaning ascribed to medication use and four standardized measures of medication-related beliefs, behaviours, symptoms, and satisfaction. RESULTS: This study suggests that patients' perception of meaning associated with medication taking was categorized as positive, negative, or absent. Symptom persistence influenced a majority of patient beliefs in the efficacy medicines, and patients with more positive meaningful associations with their medicines were more likely to remain adherent during the course of this study. CONCLUSIONS: Development of meaningful associations with medicines may improve long-term adherence with prescribed medication in heart failure.

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10.1177/1474515112447734

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Granger, BB, K McBroom, HB Bosworth, A Hernandez and I Ekman (2012). The meanings associated with medicines in heart failure patients. European journal of cardiovascular nursing : journal of the Working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiology, 12(3). pp. 276–283. 10.1177/1474515112447734 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/30037.

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Scholars@Duke

Granger

Bradi Bartrug Granger

Research Professor in the School of Nursing

Dr. Bradi Granger is a Research Professor at Duke University School of Nursing, Director of the Duke Heart Center Nursing Research Program, and adjunct faculty at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden. She is also a core faculty at the Duke-Margolis Center for Health Policy. Dr. Granger received her doctorate in nursing from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, her MSN from Duke University, and her BSN from the University of Tennessee at Knoxville.

Dr. Granger has extensive clinical experience in cardiovascular nursing, and her clinical work as a Clinical Nurse Specialist has been dedicated to overcoming barriers to the use and conduct of research in the service setting through the development of pragmatic tools that change the way nurses learn about, apply, and conduct nursing science. She has developed an innovative model for clinical inquiry and research in the hospital setting, which has been adopted in clinical settings across the U.S. and abroad. Dr. Granger is an active member of the Council for the Advancement of Nursing Science, the American Association of Critical Care Nurses, the American Heart Association, and the European Society for Patient Adherence, Compliance, and Persistence. 

Bosworth

Hayden Barry Bosworth

Professor in Population Health Sciences

Dr. Bosworth is a health services researcher and Deputy Director of the Center of Innovation to Accelerate Discovery and Practice Transformation (ADAPT)  at the Durham VA Medical Center. He is also Vice Chair of Education and Professor of Population Health Sciences. He is also a Professor of Medicine, Psychiatry, and Nursing at Duke University Medical Center and Adjunct Professor in Health Policy and Administration at the School of Public Health at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests comprise three overarching areas of research: 1) clinical research that provides knowledge for improving patients’ treatment adherence and self-management in chronic care; 2) translation research to improve access to quality of care; and 3) eliminate health care disparities. 

Dr. Bosworth is the recipient of an American Heart Association established investigator award, the 2013 VA Undersecretary Award for Outstanding Achievement in Health Services Research (The annual award is the highest honor for VA health services researchers), and a VA Senior Career Scientist Award. In terms of self-management, Dr. Bosworth has expertise developing interventions to improve health behaviors related to hypertension, coronary artery disease, and depression, and has been developing and implementing tailored patient interventions to reduce the burden of other chronic diseases. These trials focus on motivating individuals to initiate health behaviors and sustaining them long term and use members of the healthcare team, particularly pharmacists and nurses. He has been the Principal Investigator of over 30 trials resulting in over 400 peer reviewed publications and four books. This work has been or is being implemented in multiple arenas including Medicaid of North Carolina, private payers, The United Kingdom National Health System Direct, Kaiser Health care system, and the Veterans Affairs.

Areas of Expertise: Health Behavior, Health Services Research, Implementation Science, Health Measurement, and Health Policy


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