Sex differences in the level and rate of change of physical function and grip strength in the Danish 1905-cohort study.

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2010-08

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Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The study was conducted to examine sex differences in the initial level and rate of change in physical function and grip strength. METHOD: The baseline survey included 2,262 Danes born in 1905 and alive in 1998 and followed-up in 2000, 2003, and 2005. Hence, the authors fully used the power of having a cohort with multiple assessments in late life and virtually complete follow-up of lifespan (through December 2008). Latent growth curve modeling was used. RESULTS: Men had higher initial levels and rates of decline in strength score and grip strength. Lifespan was positively correlated with intercepts and slopes. DISCUSSION: The Danish data suggested that the longest-living individuals have higher initial levels of strength score and grip strength and smaller rate of change. The data further suggested that the initial level of strength score and grip strength was more predictive of mortality than the rate of change was, and the predictive effects were similar in men and women.

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10.1177/0898264310366752

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Oksuzyan, Anna, Heiner Maier, Matt McGue, James W Vaupel and Kaare Christensen (2010). Sex differences in the level and rate of change of physical function and grip strength in the Danish 1905-cohort study. J Aging Health, 22(5). pp. 589–610. 10.1177/0898264310366752 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/14785.

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