Dual infection with Ehrlichia chaffeensis and a spotted fever group rickettsia: a case report.

Abstract

Well-documented cases of simultaneous human infection with more than one tick-borne pathogen are rare. To our knowledge only two dual infections have been reported: simultaneous human infection with the agent of human granulocytic ehrlichiosis and Borrelia burgdorferi and simultaneous human infection with B. burgdorferi and Babesia microti (1-2). Rocky Mountain spotted fever has long been known to be endemic in North Carolina; cases of human ehrlichial infection were recognized there soon after Ehrlichia chaffeensis was recognized as an important cause of tick-borne disease in the southeastern United States. Because both Rocky Mountain spotted fever and ehrlichiosis are prevalent in North Carolina, occasional cases of simultaneous human infection by rickettsial and ehrlichial agents would not be surprising; however, no such cases seem to have been reported.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.3201/eid0402.980222

Publication Info

Sexton, DJ, GR Corey, C Carpenter, LQ Kong, T Gandhi, E Breitschwerdt, B Hegarty, SM Chen, et al. (1998). Dual infection with Ehrlichia chaffeensis and a spotted fever group rickettsia: a case report. Emerging infectious diseases, 4(2). pp. 311–316. 10.3201/eid0402.980222 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/21272.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Corey

Gordon Ralph Corey

Gary Hock Distinguished Professor Emeritus in Global Health, in the School of Medicine

My research is based at the Duke Clinical Research Institute, a large academic clinical research organization designed to conduct clinical trials from small local studies to worldwide trials. The focus of my research is bacterial infections: complicated skin and skin structure infections; postoperative wound infections; hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia; bacteremia; and endocarditis. Many of these trials are conducted in concert with the pharmaceutical industry in order to register new antibiotics. In addition, as director of infectious diseases at the DCRI I oversee the work of the mycology group, and tuberculosis trials. This work also includes work supported by NIH grants including sepsis trials, the Staph Aureus and Staph Epi Bacteremia Groups, and the International Collaboration of Endocarditis. The team of investigators with whom I work is highly experienced, amazingly productive and wonderfully collegial.

As a result of my longstanding interest in tropical medicine and the generosity of my patients as well as the Hubert Family we have been able to establish the Hubert-Yeargan Center for Global Health. As a result we have developed a medical center-wide fellowship in Global Health. I am presently the Director of the Center and the Gary Hock Distinguished Professor of Global Health.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.