Validation of the Sleep Regularity Index in Older Adults and Associations with Cardiometabolic Risk.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2018-09-21

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

132
views
60
downloads

Citation Stats

Abstract

Sleep disturbances, including insufficient sleep duration and circadian misalignment, confer risk for cardiometabolic disease. Less is known about the association between the regularity of sleep/wake schedules and cardiometabolic risk. This study evaluated the external validity of a new metric, the Sleep Regularity Index (SRI), among older adults (n = 1978; mean age 68.7 ± 9.2), as well as relationships between the SRI and cardiometabolic risk using data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA). Results indicated that sleep irregularity was associated with delayed sleep timing, increased daytime sleep and sleepiness, and reduced light exposure, but was independent of sleep duration. Greater sleep irregularity was also correlated with 10-year risk of cardiovascular disease and greater obesity, hypertension, fasting glucose, hemoglobin A1C, and diabetes status. Finally, greater sleep irregularity was associated with increased perceived stress and depression, psychiatric factors integrally tied to cardiometabolic disease. These results suggest that the SRI is a useful measure of sleep regularity in older adults. Additionally, sleep irregularity may represent a target for early identification and prevention of cardiometabolic disease. Future studies may clarify the causal direction of these effects, mechanisms underlying links between sleep irregularity and cardiometabolic risk, and the utility of sleep interventions in reducing cardiometabolic risk.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1038/s41598-018-32402-5

Publication Info

Lunsford-Avery, Jessica R, Matthew M Engelhard, Ann Marie Navar and Scott H Kollins (2018). Validation of the Sleep Regularity Index in Older Adults and Associations with Cardiometabolic Risk. Scientific reports, 8(1). p. 14158. 10.1038/s41598-018-32402-5 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18140.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Lunsford-Avery

Jessica Ruth Lunsford-Avery

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

I am a clinical psychologist who specializes in empirically supported evaluation and treatment of psychiatric and behavioral disorders across the lifespan. I offer a range of psychological interventions including parent behavior management training and academic skills training for youth and families impacted by ADHD and developmental disorders, as well as cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT) for adults with a range of psychiatric conditions, including ADHD, mood disorders and anxiety.

Engelhard

Matthew M. Engelhard

Assistant Professor of Biostatistics & Bioinformatics

Developing new machine learning methods for multi-modal longitudinal clinical data to support clinical decision-making.

Kollins

Scott Haden Kollins

Adjunct Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Scott H. Kollins, PhD received his undergraduate degree in psychology from Duke and his Master’s and Doctorate degrees in Clinical Psychology from Auburn University. After completing his clinical internship at the University of Mississippi Medical Center, where he served as Chief Intern, he joined the faculty of the Department of Psychology at Western Michigan University for three years, before joining the Duke faculty in 2000. Dr. Kollins has published more than 125 scientific papers in peer-reviewed journals.  Over the past 10 years, his research has been supported by 6 different federal agencies, including NICHD, NIDA, NIMH, NIEHS, NINDS, and EPA, and he currently holds a mid-career K24 award from NIDA.  He has also served as PI on more than 40 industry-funded clinical trials and is a consultant to a number of pharmaceutical companies in the area of ADHD clinical psychopharmacology.  He has served as a standing member of the Child Psychopathology and Developmental Disabilities study section and also served as an ad-hoc reviewer for 10 additional NIH study sections and 7 international granting agencies. He is an Associate Editor for the Journal of Attention Disorders and has reviewed for more than 50 different peer-reviewed journals. He is an elected member of the College on Problems of Drug Dependence and the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology. Dr. Kollins is a licensed clinical psychologist and maintains a practice through the ADHD Program’s outpatient clinic. His research interests are in the areas of psychopharmacology and the intersection of ADHD and substance abuse, particularly cigarette smoking.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.