Generation of a microglial developmental index in mice and in humans reveals a sex difference in maturation and immune reactivity.

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2018-02

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© 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Glia. 2017 Sep; 65 (9),1504–1520. DOI:10.1002/glia.23176. The above referenced article was published with an incorrect image and legend for Figure. The authors apologize for this error and provide the correct Figure and legend below: (Figure presented.) Gene expression changes in microglia following an immune challenge are related to development. Top 1,000 genes were selected between different group comparisons to input into DAVID gene functional annotation software (https://david.ncifcrf.gov/tools.jsp). Top seven highly enriched gene functional groups were chosen for representation of group differences: (a) P60 vs. E18, (b) P60 females vs. males, (c) P60 male LPS vs. SAL, (d) P60 female LPS vs. SAL. Immune response genes are represented as green bars, membrane protein and signaling molecules as purple bars, and miscellaneous genes as orange bars. (e) Heat map of gene expression changes depicts upregulation or downregulation of individual genes in different group comparisons. Red = upregulation, blue = downregulation [Color figure can be viewed at wileyonlinelibrary.com].

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10.1002/glia.23277

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Hanamsagar, Richa, Mark D Alter, Carina S Block, Haley Sullivan, Jessica L Bolton and Staci D Bilbo (2018). Generation of a microglial developmental index in mice and in humans reveals a sex difference in maturation and immune reactivity. Glia, 66(2). p. 460. 10.1002/glia.23277 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/18493.

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