Mesenchymal Stem Cell/Red Blood Cell-Inspired Nanoparticle Therapy in Mice with Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Acute Liver Failure.

Abstract

Acute liver failure is a critical condition characterized by global hepatocyte death and often time needs a liver transplantation. Such treatment is largely limited by donor organ shortage. Stem cell therapy offers a promising option to patients with acute liver failure. Yet, therapeutic efficacy and feasibility are hindered by delivery route and storage instability of live cell products. We fabricated a nanoparticle that carries the beneficial regenerative factors from mesenchymal stem cells and further coated it with the membranes of red blood cells to increase blood stability. Unlike uncoated nanoparticles, these particles promote liver cell proliferation in vitro and have lower internalization by macrophage cells. After intravenous delivery, these artificial stem cell analogs are able to remain in the liver and mitigate carbon tetrachloride-induced liver failure in a mouse model, as gauged by histology and liver function test. Our technology provides an innovative and off-the-shelf strategy to treat liver failure.

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Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1021/acsnano.8b00553

Publication Info

Liang, Hongxia, Ke Huang, Teng Su, Zhenhua Li, Shiqi Hu, Phuong-Uyen Dinh, Emily A Wrona, Chen Shao, et al. (2018). Mesenchymal Stem Cell/Red Blood Cell-Inspired Nanoparticle Therapy in Mice with Carbon Tetrachloride-Induced Acute Liver Failure. ACS nano, 12(7). pp. 6536–6544. 10.1021/acsnano.8b00553 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/26327.

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Su

Teng Su

Assistant Professor in Medicine
Allen

Tyler Allen

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