Self-regulatory processes underlying structural stigma and health.

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2014-02

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Abstract

In this article, we examine self-regulatory processes that are initiated by structural stigma. To date, the literature on self-regulation as a mechanism that underlies stigma and health outcomes has focused primarily on harmful health-related behaviors that are associated with perceived discrimination. Numerous studies find that when people experience discrimination, they are more likely to engage in behaviors that pose risks for health, such as overeating and substance use. However, a large body of literature also finds that low power - which is also a chronic, though often more subtle, experience for stigmatized groups - is associated with a heightened activation of inhibitory processes. This inhibition system has wide-ranging influences on cognition, behavior, and affect. We provide an overview of these two literatures, examine synergies, and propose potential implications for measurement and research design.

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10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.12.029

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Richman, Laura Smart, and Micah R Lattanner (2014). Self-regulatory processes underlying structural stigma and health. Soc Sci Med, 103. pp. 94–100. 10.1016/j.socscimed.2013.12.029 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11798.

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Scholars@Duke

Richman

Laura Smart Richman

Adjunct Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences

Dr. Richman's research broadly focuses on understanding factors that contribute to health disparities for disadvantaged groups. Some research areas include the role of social status, gentrification, and social network characteristics on health behaviors and outcomes. 

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Areas of expertise: Health Behavior and Health Measurement


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