Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells and its application in human disease therapy.

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2010-11

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Abstract

The use of stem cells for tissue regeneration and repair is advancing both at the bench and bedside. Stem cells isolated from bone marrow are currently being tested for their therapeutic potential in a variety of clinical conditions including cardiovascular injury, kidney failure, cancer, and neurological and bone disorders. Despite the advantages, stem cell therapy is still limited by low survival, engraftment, and homing to damage area as well as inefficiencies in differentiating into fully functional tissues. Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells is being explored as a means to circumvent some of these problems. This review presents the current understanding of the use of genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells in human disease therapy with emphasis on genetic modifications aimed to improve survival, homing, angiogenesis, and heart function after myocardial infarction. Advancements in other disease areas are also discussed.

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10.1089/hum.2010.165

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Hodgkinson, Conrad P, José A Gomez, Maria Mirotsou and Victor J Dzau (2010). Genetic engineering of mesenchymal stem cells and its application in human disease therapy. Hum Gene Ther, 21(11). pp. 1513–1526. 10.1089/hum.2010.165 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/3377.

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Scholars@Duke

Conrad Phillip Hodgkinson

Associate Professor in Medicine
Dzau

Victor J. Dzau

James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Medicine

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