Blue Vision (Cyanopsia) Associated With TURP Syndrome: A Case Report.

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2018-05-29

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Abstract

There have been many complications associated with transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP), known as TURP syndrome. Of the various irrigation fluids used for TURP, glycine irrigant has been historically popular given its relatively low cost. It is also a nonconductive solution and only slightly hypoosmolar, reducing the risk of burn injury or significant hemolysis. However, there have been many case reports of central nervous system toxicity such as transient blindness and encephalopathy related to glycine toxicity. Here, we report blue vision (cyanopsia), which has never been reported as a symptom of TURP syndrome.

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10.1213/xaa.0000000000000809

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Fox, William C, and Richard E Moon (2018). Blue Vision (Cyanopsia) Associated With TURP Syndrome: A Case Report. A&A practice. 10.1213/xaa.0000000000000809 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/17199.

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Moon

Richard Edward Moon

Professor of Anesthesiology

Research interests include the study of cardiorespiratory function in humans during challenging clinical settings including the perioperative period, and exposure to environmental conditions such as diving and high altitude. Studies have included gas exchange during diving, the pathophysiology of high altitude and immersion pulmonary edema, the effect of anesthesia and postoperative analgesia on pulmonary function and monitoring of tissue oxygenation. Ongoing human studies include the effect of respiratory muscle training on chemosensitivity and blood gases during stressful breathing: underwater exercise.


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