3-[211At]astato-4-fluorobenzylguanidine: a potential therapeutic agent with prolonged retention by neuroblastoma cells.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

1997

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

417
views
185
downloads

Abstract

An analogue of meta-iodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) in which an aromatic hydrogen was replaced with fluorine has been found to possess many properties similar to those of the parent compound. Moreover, 4-fluoro-3-iodobenzylguanidine (FIBG) was retained in vitro by human neuroblastoma cells to a much greater extent than MIBG itself. Since alpha-emitters such as 211At could be valuable for the treatment of micrometastatic disease, an FIBG analogue in which the iodine atom is replaced by 211At would be of interest. In this study, we have evaluated the in vitro and in vivo properties of 3-[211At]astato-4-fluorobenzylguanidine ([211At]AFBG). The specific binding of [211At]AFBG to SK-N-SH human neuroblastoma cells remained fairly constant over 2- to 3-log activity range and was similar to that of [131I]MIBG. The uptake of [211At]AFBG by this cell line was reduced by desipramine, ouabain, 4 degrees C incubation, noradrenaline, unlabelled MIBG and FIBG, suggesting that its uptake is specifically mediated through an active uptake-1 mechanism. Over the 16 h period studied, the amount of [211At]AFBG retained was similar to that of [131I]FIBG, whereas the per cent of retained meta-[211At]astatobenzylguanidine ([211At]MABG) was considerably less than that of [131I]FIBG (53% vs 75%; P < 0.05). The IC50 values for the inhibition of uptake of [131I]MIBG, [211At]MABG, [125I]FIBG and [211At]AFBG by unlabelled MIBG were 209, 300, 407 and 661 nM respectively, suggesting that the affinities of these tracers for the noradrenaline transporter in SK-N-SH cells increase in that order. Compared with [211At]MABG, higher uptake of [211At]AFBG was seen in vivo in normal mouse target tissues such as heart and, to a certain extent, in adrenals. That the uptake of [211At]AFBG in these tissues was related to the uptake-1 mechanism was demonstrated by its reduction when mice were pretreated with desipramine. However, the stability of [211At]AFBG towards in vivo dehalogenation was less than that of [211At]MABG, as evidenced by the higher uptake of 211At in thyroid, spleen, lungs and stomach.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Scholars@Duke

Vaidyanathan

Ganesan Vaidyanathan

Professor Emeritus in Radiology

Dr. Vaidyanathan is a professor in the Department of Radiology.  He is a member of the Nuclear Medicine track of the Medical Physics Graduate Program.  His research involves development of radiopharmaceuticals especially for oncologic applications.  Some of the projects he is involved in are given below.

I.          New methods of radiohalogenating antibodies and its variants 

a) Development of newer residualizing agents for the radiohalogenation of internalizing monoclonal antibodies.

b)  Development of fluorine-18 labeled residualizing agents for labeling nanobodies.

c) Pre-targeting approach via bioorthogonal chemistry for in vivo labeling of antibodies and nanobodies with 18F and 211At.

d)  Methods to label antibodies pre-conjugated with a prosthetic group of the tin precursor of residualizing agents.

e) Multimodal prosthetic groups for labeling antibodies and peptides with multiple radioisotopes.

II.         MIBG Analogs for PET imaging

Radioiodinated MIBG is used in the diagnosis of the pathophysiology of the heart as well as neuroendocrine tumors such as neuroblastoma (NB).  Design and development of newer fluorine-18 labeled MIBG analogues useful in the PET imaging of NB as well as that of myocardial diseases.

III. Noninvasive Imaging of Alkylguanine-DNA alkyltransferase (AGT) 

AGT is a DNA repair protein and is primarily responsible for drug resistance in alkylator chemotherapy. An inverse correlation has been established between the tumor AGT content and the therapeutic outcome. The amount of AGT varies from tumor to tumor and within a group of patients of similar cancer. Thus, it is important to quantify tumor AGT of individual patients before administering alkylator chemotherapy. Our goal is to develop radiolabeled agents with which AGT can be quantified in a noninvasive manner by PET or SPECT imaging. 

IV. PSMA targeting for prostate cancer therapy 

Development of At-211 labeled urea-based inhibitor of Prostate-specific membrane antigen.

Zalutsky

Michael Rod Zalutsky

Jonathan Spicehandler, M.D. Distinguished Professor of Neuro Oncology, in the School of Medicine

The overall objective of our laboratory is the development of novel radioactive compounds for improving the diagnosis and treatment of cancer. This work primarily involves radiohalo-genation of biomolecules via site-specific approaches, generally via demetallation reactions. Radionuclides utilized for imaging include I-123, I-124 and F-18, the later two being of particular interest because they can be used for the quantification of biochemical and physiological processes in the living human through positron emission tomography. For therapy, astatine-211 decays by the emission of alpha-particles, a type of radiation considerably more cytotoxic that the beta-particles used in conventional endoradiotherapy. The range of At-211 alpha particles is only a few cell diameters, offering the possibility of extremely focal irradiation of malignant cells while leaving neighboring cells intact. Highlights of recent work include: a)
development of reagents for protein and peptide radioiodination that decrease deiodination in vivo by up to 100-fold, b) demonstration that At-211 labeled monoclonal antibodies are effective in the treatment of a rat model of neoplastic meningitis, c) synthesis of a thymidine analogue labeled with At-211 and the demonstration that this molecule is taken up in cellular DNA with highly cytotoxicity even at levels of only one atom bound per cell and d) development of
radiohalobenzylguanidines which are specifically cytotoxic for human neuroblastoma cells.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.