Perceived cannabis use norms and cannabis use among adolescents in the United States.

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2015-05

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Abstract

Due to changes in cannabis policies, concerns about cannabis use (CU) in adolescents have increased. The population of nonwhite groups is growing quickly in the United States. We examined perceived CU norms and their association with CU and CU disorder (CUD) for White, Black, Hispanic, Native-American, Asian-American, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (NH/PI), and mixed-race adolescents. Data were from adolescents (12-17 years) in the 2004-2012 National Surveys on Drug Use and Health (N = 163,837). Substance use and CUD were assessed by computer-assisted, self-interviewing methods. Blacks, Hispanics, Native-Americans, and mixed-race adolescents had greater odds of past-year CU and CUD than Whites. Among past-year cannabis users (CUs), Hispanics and Native-Americans had greater odds of having a CUD than Whites. Asian-Americans had the highest prevalence of perceived parental or close friends' CU disapproval. Native-Americans and mixed-race adolescents had lower odds than Whites of perceiving CU disapproval from parents or close friends. In adjusted analyses, adolescent's disapproval of CU, as well as perceived disapproval by parents or close friends, were associated with a decreased odds of CU in each racial/ethnic group, except for NHs/PIs. Adolescent's disapproval of CU was associated with a decreased odds of CUD among CUs for Whites (personal, parental, and close friends' disapproval), Hispanics (personal, parental, and close friends' disapproval), and mixed-race adolescents (personal, close friends' disapproval). Racial/ethnic differences in adolescent CU prevalence were somewhat consistent with adolescents' reports of CU norm patterns. Longitudinal research on CU health effects should oversample nonwhite adolescents to assure an adequate sample for analysis and reporting.

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10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.02.022

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Wu, Li-Tzy, Marvin S Swartz, Kathleen T Brady, Rick H Hoyle and undefined NIDA AAPI Workgroup (2015). Perceived cannabis use norms and cannabis use among adolescents in the United States. J Psychiatr Res, 64. pp. 79–87. 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2015.02.022 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10591.

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Scholars@Duke

Swartz

Marvin Stanley Swartz

Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

My major research interest is in examining the effectiveness of services for severely mentally ill individuals, including factors that improve or impede good outcomes. Current research includes: the effectiveness of involuntary outpatient commitment, psychiatric advance directives, criminal justice outcomes for persons with mental illnesses, violence and mental illness and antipsychotic medications.

I also served as member of the MacArthur Foundation Research Network on Mandated Community Treatment. In this and related work we are examining the role legal tools such as Psychiatric Advance Directives may play in improving outcomes for persons with severe mental illness. In this regard, I served as Co-PI with Jeffrey Swanson of a NIMH study examining the effectiveness of Psychiatric Advance Directives and a MacArthur Foundation grant supporting their dissemination. We are also evaluating New York's Assisted Outpatient Treatment Program (Kendra's Law) and estimating the cost of criminal justice involvement in severely mentally ill individuals.

I am also involved in clinical trials in schizophrenia and served as Co-PI of the NIMH funded Clinical Antipsychotics Trials of Intervention Effectiveness study investigating the role of antipsychotics in treatment outcomes in schizophrenia and Alzheimer’s Disease.

Hoyle

Rick Hoyle

Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience

Research in my lab concerns the means by which adolescents and emerging adults manage pursuit of their goals through self-regulation. We take a broad view of self-regulation, accounting for the separate and interactive influences of personality, environment (e.g., home, school, neighborhood), cognition and emotion, and social influences on the many facets of goal management. Although we occasionally study these influences in controlled laboratory experiments, our preference is to study the pursuit of longer-term, personally meaningful goals “in the wild.” Much of our work is longitudinal and involves repeated assessments focused on the pursuit of specific goals over time. Some studies span years and involve data collection once or twice per year. Others span weeks and involve intensive repeated assessments, sometimes several times per day. We use these rich data to model the means by which people manage real goals in the course of everyday life.

In conjunction with this work, we spend considerable time and effort on developing and refining means of measuring or observing the many factors at play in self-regulation. In addition to developing self-report measures of self-control and grit and measures of the processes we expect to wax and wane over time in the course of goal pursuit, we are working on unobtrusive approaches to tracking goal pursuit and progress through mobile phones and wearable devices.


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