Text Recycling in Scientific Writing.

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2019-06

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Abstract

Text recycling, often called "self-plagiarism", is the practice of reusing textual material from one's prior documents in a new work. The practice presents a complex set of ethical and practical challenges to the scientific community, many of which have not been addressed in prior discourse on the subject. This essay identifies and discusses these factors in a systematic fashion, concluding with a new definition of text recycling that takes these factors into account. Topics include terminology, what is not text recycling, factors affecting judgements about the appropriateness of text recycling, and visual materials.

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10.1007/s11948-017-0008-y

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Moskovitz, C (2019). Text Recycling in Scientific Writing. Science and engineering ethics, 25(3). pp. 813–851. 10.1007/s11948-017-0008-y Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19409.

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Moskovitz

Cary Moskovitz

Professor of the Practice in the Thompson Writing Program

Cary Moskovitz is Director of Writing in the Disciplines in the Thompson Writing Program. He also directs the Duke Reader Project and the Text Recycling Research Project.


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