Unipedal balance is affected by lower extremity joint arthroplasty procedure 1 year following surgery.

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2015-02

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Abstract

Lower Extremity Joint Arthroplasty (LEJA) surgery is an effective way to alleviate painful osteoarthritis. Unfortunately, these surgeries do not normalize the loading asymmetry during the single leg stance phase of gait. Therefore, we examined single leg balance in 234 TJA patients (75 hips, 65 knees, 94 ankles) approximately 12 months following surgery. Patients passed if they maintained single leg balance for 10s with their eyes open. Patients one year following total hip arthroplasty (THA-63%) and total knee arthroplasty (TKA-69%) had similar pass rates compared to a total ankle arthroplasty (TAA-9%). Patients following THA and TKA exhibit better unilateral balance in comparison with TAA patients. It may be beneficial to include a rigorous proprioception and balance training program in TAA patients to optimize functional outcomes.

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10.1016/j.arth.2014.08.031

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Butler, Robert J, Ramon A Ruberte Thiele, C Lowry Barnes, Michael P Bolognesi and Robin M Queen (2015). Unipedal balance is affected by lower extremity joint arthroplasty procedure 1 year following surgery. J Arthroplasty, 30(2). pp. 286–289. 10.1016/j.arth.2014.08.031 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/10290.

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Bolognesi

Michael Paul Bolognesi

Virginia Flowers Baker Distinguished Professor of Orthopaedic Surgery

As chief of the adult reconstruction service, the majority of my research effort has been directed toward clinical outcomes, implant survivorship, functional recovery, the biology of hip and knee arthritis and cost effectiveness.


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