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Young Children Want to See Others Get the Help They Need

dc.contributor.author Hepach, R
dc.contributor.author Vaish, A
dc.contributor.author Grossmann, T
dc.contributor.author Tomasello, Michael
dc.date.accessioned 2017-02-17T16:59:45Z
dc.date.issued 2016-11-01
dc.identifier.issn 0009-3920
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/13636
dc.description.abstract © 2016 The Authors. Child Development © 2016 Society for Research in Child Development, Inc.Children's instrumental helping has sometimes been interpreted as a desire to complete action sequences or to restore the physical order of things. Two-year-old children (n = 51) selectively retrieved for an adult the object he needed rather than one he did not (but which equally served to restore the previous order of things), and those with greater internal arousal (i.e., pupil dilation) were faster to help. In a second experiment (n = 64), children's arousal increased when they witnessed an adult respond inappropriately to another adult's need. This was not the case in a nonsocial control condition. These findings suggest that children's helping is not aimed at restoring the order of things but rather at seeing another person's need fulfilled.
dc.relation.ispartof Child Development
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1111/cdev.12633
dc.title Young Children Want to See Others Get the Help They Need
dc.type Journal article
pubs.begin-page 1703
pubs.end-page 1714
pubs.issue 6
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Evolutionary Anthropology
pubs.organisational-group Psychology and Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 87
dc.identifier.eissn 1467-8624


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