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Self-Plagiarism, Text Recycling, and Science Education

dc.contributor.author Moskovitz, C
dc.date.accessioned 2019-10-02T13:02:59Z
dc.date.available 2019-10-02T13:02:59Z
dc.date.issued 2015-12-30
dc.identifier.issn 0006-3568
dc.identifier.issn 1525-3244
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/19382
dc.description.abstract Academicians generally consider it unethical to reuse text from published work without explicit attribution. However, in practice, the conventions and ethics associated with reusing text vary considerably across academic domains and genres. Although it may be anathema in the humanities, certain types of reuse are both common and acceptable in contemporary scientific discourse. The boundaries of acceptable practice are complex, however, so there is a strong temptation to ignore the topic in educational settings. Because the fallout from innocent errors can be damaging, scientists must assume responsibility for determining what constitutes acceptable reuse in their domain and for instructing future scientists in these practices.
dc.language en
dc.publisher American Institute of Biological Sciences
dc.relation.ispartof BioScience
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1093/biosci/biv160
dc.subject Science & Technology
dc.subject Life Sciences & Biomedicine
dc.subject Biology
dc.subject Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics
dc.subject WHAT-YOU-WANT
dc.title Self-Plagiarism, Text Recycling, and Science Education
dc.type Other article
duke.contributor.id Moskovitz, C|0275480
dc.date.updated 2019-10-02T13:02:58Z
pubs.begin-page 5
pubs.end-page 6
pubs.issue 1
pubs.organisational-group Trinity College of Arts & Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Thompson Writing Program
pubs.publication-status Published
pubs.volume 66
duke.contributor.orcid Moskovitz, C|0000-0001-5324-2407


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