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Variability in frontotemporal brain structure: the importance of recruitment of African Americans in neuroscience research.

dc.contributor.author Isamah, Nneka
dc.contributor.author Faison, Warachal
dc.contributor.author Payne, Martha E
dc.contributor.author MacFall, James
dc.contributor.author Steffens, David C
dc.contributor.author Beyer, John L
dc.contributor.author Krishnan, K Ranga
dc.contributor.author Taylor, Warren D
dc.coverage.spatial United States
dc.date.accessioned 2011-06-21T17:32:20Z
dc.date.issued 2010-10-26
dc.identifier http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21049028
dc.identifier.uri https://hdl.handle.net/10161/4581
dc.description.abstract BACKGROUND: Variation in brain structure is both genetically and environmentally influenced. The question about potential differences in brain anatomy across populations of differing race and ethnicity remains a controversial issue. There are few studies specifically examining racial or ethnic differences and also few studies that test for race-related differences in context of other neuropsychiatric research, possibly due to the underrepresentation of ethnic minorities in clinical research. It is within this context that we conducted a secondary data analysis examining volumetric MRI data from healthy participants and compared the volumes of the amygdala, hippocampus, lateral ventricles, caudate nucleus, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and total cerebral volume between Caucasian and African-American participants. We discuss the importance of this finding in context of neuroimaging methodology, but also the need for improved recruitment of African Americans in clinical research and its broader implications for a better understanding of the neural basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This was a case control study in the setting of an academic medical center outpatient service. Participants consisted of 44 Caucasians and 33 ethnic minorities. The following volumetric data were obtained: amygdala, hippocampus, lateral ventricles, caudate nucleus, orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) and total cerebrum. Each participant completed a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Our primary finding in analyses of brain subregions was that when compared to Caucasians, African Americans exhibited larger left OFC volumes (F (1,68) = 7.50, p = 0.008). CONCLUSIONS: The biological implications of our findings are unclear as we do not know what factors may be contributing to these observed differences. However, this study raises several questions that have important implications for the future of neuropsychiatric research.
dc.language eng
dc.language.iso en_US
dc.publisher Public Library of Science (PLoS)
dc.relation.ispartof PLoS One
dc.relation.isversionof 10.1371/journal.pone.0013642
dc.subject Adult
dc.subject African Americans
dc.subject Biomedical Research
dc.subject Female
dc.subject Frontal Lobe
dc.subject Humans
dc.subject Magnetic Resonance Imaging
dc.subject Male
dc.subject Middle Aged
dc.subject Patient Selection
dc.subject Temporal Lobe
dc.title Variability in frontotemporal brain structure: the importance of recruitment of African Americans in neuroscience research.
dc.title.alternative
dc.type Journal article
duke.contributor.id Payne, Martha E|0037664
duke.contributor.id MacFall, James|0113645
duke.contributor.id Steffens, David C|0117291
duke.contributor.id Beyer, John L|0169147
duke.contributor.id Krishnan, K Ranga|0068873
dc.description.version Version of Record
duke.date.pubdate 2010-10-26
duke.description.issue 10
duke.description.volume 5
dc.relation.journal Plos One
pubs.author-url http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21049028
pubs.begin-page e13642
pubs.issue 10
pubs.organisational-group Clinical Science Departments
pubs.organisational-group Duke
pubs.organisational-group Duke-UNC Center for Brain Imaging and Analysis
pubs.organisational-group Institutes and Centers
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Geriatric Behavioral Health
pubs.organisational-group Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, Translational Neuroscience
pubs.organisational-group Radiology
pubs.organisational-group School of Medicine
pubs.organisational-group Staff
pubs.publication-status Published online
pubs.volume 5
dc.identifier.eissn 1932-6203


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