Calibrating single-ended fiber-optic Raman spectra distributed temperature sensing data.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2011

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

365
views
227
downloads

Citation Stats

Attention Stats

Abstract

Hydrologic research is a very demanding application of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing (DTS) in terms of precision, accuracy and calibration. The physics behind the most frequently used DTS instruments are considered as they apply to four calibration methods for single-ended DTS installations. The new methods presented are more accurate than the instrument-calibrated data, achieving accuracies on the order of tenths of a degree root mean square error (RMSE) and mean bias. Effects of localized non-uniformities that violate the assumptions of single-ended calibration data are explored and quantified. Experimental design considerations such as selection of integration times or selection of the length of the reference sections are discussed, and the impacts of these considerations on calibrated temperatures are explored in two case studies.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.3390/s111110859

Publication Info

Hausner, Mark B, Francisco Suárez, Kenneth E Glander, Nick van de Giesen, John S Selker and Scott W Tyler (2011). Calibrating single-ended fiber-optic Raman spectra distributed temperature sensing data. Sensors (Basel), 11(11). pp. 10859–10879. 10.3390/s111110859 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/6394.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Glander

Kenneth Earl Glander

Professor Emeritus of Evolutionary Anthropology

Primate ecology and social organization: the interaction between feeding patterns and social structure; evolutionary development of optimal group size and composition; factors affecting short and long-term demographic changes in stable groups; primate use of regenerating forests.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.