In situ studies of the primary immune response to (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl. II. A common clonal origin for periarteriolar lymphoid sheath-associated foci and germinal centers.

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1992-09-01

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Abstract

In the genetically restricted response that follows immunization with (4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenyl)acetyl coupled to protein carriers, two distinct populations of B cells are observed in the spleens of C57BL/6 mice. By 48 h postimmunization, foci of antigen-binding B cells appear along the periphery of the periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths. These foci expand to contain large numbers of antibody-forming cells that neither bind the lectin, peanut agglutinin, nor mutate the rearranged immunoglobulin variable region loci. Germinal centers containing peanut agglutinin-positive B cells can be observed by 96-120 h after immunization. Although specific for the immunizing hapten, these B cells do not produce substantial amounts of antibody, but are the population that undergoes somatic hypermutation and affinity-driven selection. Both focus and germinal center populations are pauciclonal, founded, on average, by three or fewer B lymphocytes. Despite the highly specialized roles of the focus (early antibody production) and germinal center (higher affinity memory cells) B cell populations, analysis of VH to D to JH joins in neighboring foci and germinal centers demonstrate that these B cell populations have a common clonal origin.

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Kelsoe

Garnett H. Kelsoe

James B. Duke Distinguished Professor of Immunology
  1. Lymphocyte development and antigen-driven diversification of immunoglobulin and T cell antigen receptor genes.
    2. The germinal center reaction and mechanisms for clonal selection and self - tolerance. The origins of autoimmunity.
    3. Interaction of innate- and adaptive immunity and the role of inflammation in lymphoid organogenesis.
    4. The role of secondary V(D)J gene rearrangment in lymphocyte development and malignancies.
    5. Mathematical modeling of immune responses, DNA motifs, collaborations in bioinformatics.
    6. Humoral immunity to influenza and HIV-1.

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