The Challenge of Community Representation.

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2016-10

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Abstract

Although community advisory boards (CABs) are widely used in clinical research, there is limited data regarding their composition and structure, especially in Africa. Our research provides the first qualitative study of the membership practices, selection methods, and qualifications of the six major HIV research centers that comprise the Ugandan National CAB Network (UNCN). Researchers conducted interviews ( n = 45) with CAB members and research liaisons at each of the sites. While selection practices and demographics varied between the sites, all six CABs exclusively followed a broad community membership model. Results suggest successful CABs are context dependent and thus distinct guidelines may be needed based on variables including CAB funding level, representation model, and research focus.

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10.1177/1556264616665760

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Lawrence, Carlton, and Kearsley Stewart (2016). The Challenge of Community Representation. J Empir Res Hum Res Ethics, 11(4). pp. 311–321. 10.1177/1556264616665760 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/16128.

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Stewart

Kearsley A Stewart

Professor of the Practice of Global Health

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