Whole Genome Sequencing of a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pseudo-Outbreak in a Professional Football Team.

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Date

2014-12

Authors

Anderson, Deverick J
Harris, Simon R
Godofsky, Eliot
Toriscelli, Todd
Rude, Thomas H
Elder, Kevin
Sexton, Daniel J
Pellman, Elliot J
Mayer, Thom
Fowler, Vance G

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Volume Title

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Abstract

Two American football players on the same team were diagnosed with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) skin and soft tissue infections on the same day. Our investigation, including whole genome sequencing, confirmed that players did not transmit MRSA to one another nor did they acquire the MRSA from a single source within the training facility.

Type

Journal article

Department

Description

Provenance

Subjects

American football, MRSA, outbreak investigation, whole genome sequencing

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1093/ofid/ofu096

Publication Info

Anderson, Deverick J, Simon R Harris, Eliot Godofsky, Todd Toriscelli, Thomas H Rude, Kevin Elder, Daniel J Sexton, Elliot J Pellman, et al. (2014). Whole Genome Sequencing of a Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Pseudo-Outbreak in a Professional Football Team. Open Forum Infect Dis, 1(3). p. ofu096. 10.1093/ofid/ofu096 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/13308.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Anderson

Deverick John Anderson

Professor of Medicine

Hospital epidemiology, infection control, antibiotic stewardship, multidrug-resistant organisms, device-related infections, surgical site infections, catheter-associated bloodstream infections, cost of infections, infections in community hospitals

Sexton

Daniel John Sexton

Professor Emeritus of Medicine

During the past 8 years my research interests have changed from a focus on tick-borne disease and endocarditis to a primary focus on healthcare-associated infections (HAIs). Specifically, I have been interested in HAIs in community hospitals. Using prospective data collected as part of our surveillance activities in the Duke Infection Control Outreach Network (DICON), I and my colleagues have focused on these specific areas of research:

• The accuracy and reliability of surveillance definitions used to document and trend rates of HAIs
• Outcomes of HAIs (both financial and clinical) with particular emphasis on bloodstream and surgical site infections
• Trends in HAIs due to pathogens resistant to common antimicrobial agents
• Temporal and geographic variations in the occurrence of pathogens such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus, E coli and Klebsiella pneumonia
• The prevention and control of HAIs with particular emphasis on the potential role of the environment in the transmission of HAIs

As the principal investigator on one of the 5 national epicenter grants funded by the Centers for Disease control I, along with my co-investigators from the Duke and University of North Carolina Division of Infectious Disease, are involved in a 5-year prospective study of the potential benefit of enhanced cleaning methods (such as the use of ultraviolet light emitters) in the prevention of HAIs. This study involves 9 hospitals in North Carolina and Virginia and will include a trial of 4 different cleaning methods utilized sequentially but randomly in these study hospitals over a 28-month time period. Additionally the Duke Epicenter is also undertaking prospective trials investigating the utility and reliability of new (streamlined) definitions of ventilator-associated pneumonia.


Key words that characterize my work: surgical site infections and nosocomial infections.

Fowler

Vance Garrison Fowler

Florence McAlister Distinguished Professor of Medicine

Determinants of Outcome in Patients with Staphylococcus aureus Bacteremia
Antibacterial Resistance
Pathogenesis of Bacterial Infections
Tropical medicine/International Health


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