Influences of interpolation error, electrode geometry, and the electrode-tissue interface on models of electric fields produced by deep brain stimulation.

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2014-02

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Abstract

Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is an established therapy for movement disorders, but the fundamental mechanisms by which DBS has its effects remain unknown. Computational models can provide insights into the mechanisms of DBS, but to be useful, the models must have sufficient detail to predict accurately the electric fields produced by DBS. We used a finite-element method model of the Medtronic 3387 electrode array, coupled to cable models of myelinated axons, to quantify how interpolation errors, electrode geometry, and the electrode-tissue interface affect calculation of electrical potentials and stimulation thresholds for populations of model nerve fibers. Convergence of the potentials was not a sufficient criterion for ensuring the same degree of accuracy in subsequent determination of stimulation thresholds, because the accuracy of the stimulation thresholds depended on the order of the elements. Simplifying the 3387 electrode array by ignoring the inactive contacts and extending the terminated end of the shaft had position-dependent effects on the potentials and excitation thresholds, and these simplifications may impact correlations between DBS parameters and clinical outcomes. When the current density in the bulk tissue is uniform, the effect of the electrode-tissue interface impedance could be approximated by filtering the potentials calculated with a static lumped electrical equivalent circuit. Further, for typical DBS parameters during voltage-regulated stimulation, it was valid to approximate the electrode as an ideal polarized electrode with a nonlinear capacitance. Validation of these computational considerations enables accurate modeling of the electric field produced by DBS.

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10.1109/tbme.2013.2292025

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Howell, Bryan, Sagar Naik and Warren M Grill (2014). Influences of interpolation error, electrode geometry, and the electrode-tissue interface on models of electric fields produced by deep brain stimulation. IEEE transactions on bio-medical engineering, 61(2). pp. 297–307. 10.1109/tbme.2013.2292025 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/23857.

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Scholars@Duke

Grill

Warren M. Grill

Edmund T. Pratt, Jr. School Distinguished Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Our research employs engineering approaches to understand and control neural function. We work on fundamental questions and applied development in electrical stimulation of the nervous system to restore function to individuals with neurological impairment or injury.

Current projects include:
• understanding the mechanisms of and developing advanced approaches to deep brain stimulation to treat movement disorders,
• developing novel approaches to peripheral nerve electrical stimulation for restoration of bladder function, 
• understanding the mechanisms of and developing advanced approaches to spinal cord stimulation to treat chronic pain,
• understanding and controlling the cellular effects of transcranial magnetic stimulation, and
• design of novel electrodes and waveforms for selective stimulation of the nervous system.


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