A high-throughput in vitro drug screen in a genetically engineered mouse model of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma identifies BMS-754807 as a promising therapeutic agent.

Abstract

Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPGs) represent a particularly lethal type of pediatric brain cancer with no effective therapeutic options. Our laboratory has previously reported the development of genetically engineered DIPG mouse models using the RCAS/tv-a system, including a model driven by PDGF-B, H3.3K27M, and p53 loss. These models can serve as a platform in which to test novel therapeutics prior to the initiation of human clinical trials. In this study, an in vitro high-throughput drug screen as part of the DIPG preclinical consortium using cell-lines derived from our DIPG models identified BMS-754807 as a drug of interest in DIPG. BMS-754807 is a potent and reversible small molecule multi-kinase inhibitor with many targets including IGF-1R, IR, MET, TRKA, TRKB, AURKA, AURKB. In vitro evaluation showed significant cytotoxic effects with an IC50 of 0.13 μM, significant inhibition of proliferation at a concentration of 1.5 μM, as well as inhibition of AKT activation. Interestingly, IGF-1R signaling was absent in serum-free cultures from the PDGF-B; H3.3K27M; p53 deficient model suggesting that the antitumor activity of BMS-754807 in this model is independent of IGF-1R. In vivo, systemic administration of BMS-754807 to DIPG-bearing mice did not prolong survival. Pharmacokinetic analysis demonstrated that tumor tissue drug concentrations of BMS-754807 were well below the identified IC50, suggesting that inadequate drug delivery may limit in vivo efficacy. In summary, an unbiased in vitro drug screen identified BMS-754807 as a potential therapeutic agent in DIPG, but BMS-754807 treatment in vivo by systemic delivery did not significantly prolong survival of DIPG-bearing mice.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1371/journal.pone.0118926

Publication Info

Halvorson, Kyle G, Kelly L Barton, Kristin Schroeder, Katherine L Misuraca, Christine Hoeman, Alex Chung, Donna M Crabtree, Francisco J Cordero, et al. (2015). A high-throughput in vitro drug screen in a genetically engineered mouse model of diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma identifies BMS-754807 as a promising therapeutic agent. PLoS One, 10(3). p. e0118926. 10.1371/journal.pone.0118926 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/12567.

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Scholars@Duke

Schroeder

Kristin M. Schroeder

Associate Professor of Pediatrics

I have a strong belief that all children diagnosed with cancer should have the same chance of cure regardless of where they live. Since 2014, i have spent six or more months per year in Mwanza, Tanzania, at the Bugando Medical Centre as part of the Duke Global Cancer Program. In addition to developing capacity for pediatric cancer care, my research focuses on creating interventions to improve outcomes and reducing treatment abandonment in low resource settings. 

As a trained pediatric neuro-oncologist, I am also involved in neuro-oncology capacity development in Sub-Saharan Africa, and am collaborating with a multidisciplinary team in Tanzania to establish diagnostic and treatment opportunities for patients. 


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