3D refraction correction and extraction of clinical parameters from spectral domain optical coherence tomography of the cornea.

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2010-04-26

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Abstract

Capable of three-dimensional imaging of the cornea with micrometer-scale resolution, spectral domain-optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) offers potential advantages over Placido ring and Scheimpflug photography based systems for accurate extraction of quantitative keratometric parameters. In this work, an SDOCT scanning protocol and motion correction algorithm were implemented to minimize the effects of patient motion during data acquisition. Procedures are described for correction of image data artifacts resulting from 3D refraction of SDOCT light in the cornea and from non-idealities of the scanning system geometry performed as a pre-requisite for accurate parameter extraction. Zernike polynomial 3D reconstruction and a recursive half searching algorithm (RHSA) were implemented to extract clinical keratometric parameters including anterior and posterior radii of curvature, central cornea optical power, central corneal thickness, and thickness maps of the cornea. Accuracy and repeatability of the extracted parameters obtained using a commercial 859nm SDOCT retinal imaging system with a corneal adapter were assessed using a rigid gas permeable (RGP) contact lens as a phantom target. Extraction of these parameters was performed in vivo in 3 patients and compared to commercial Placido topography and Scheimpflug photography systems. The repeatability of SDOCT central corneal power measured in vivo was 0.18 Diopters, and the difference observed between the systems averaged 0.1 Diopters between SDOCT and Scheimpflug photography, and 0.6 Diopters between SDOCT and Placido topography.

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Kuo

Anthony Nanlin Kuo

Associate Professor of Ophthalmology

Anthony Kuo, MD is an Associate Professor of Ophthalmology and Assistant Professor of Biomedical Engineering at Duke University. He is a clinician-scientist with an active clinical practice in cornea and refractive surgery and an active laboratory program developing and translating high resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) technologies for ophthalmic use.

With collaborators at Duke, he is also involved in the development and translation of intra-surgical OCT technologies. His research has been sponsored by the National Institutes of Health, Research to Prevent Blindness, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the Coulter Foundation among others.


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