Displacement of particles in microfluidics by laser-generated tandem bubbles.

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2010-11-01

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Abstract

The dynamic interaction between laser-generated tandem bubble and individual polystyrene particles of 2 and 10 μm in diameter is studied in a microfluidic channel (25 μm height) by high-speed imaging and particle image velocimetry. The asymmetric collapse of the tandem bubble produces a pair of microjets and associated long-lasting vortices that can propel a single particle to a maximum velocity of 1.4 m∕s in 30 μs after the bubble collapse with a resultant directional displacement up to 60 μm in 150 μs. This method may be useful for high-throughput cell sorting in microfluidic devices.

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10.1063/1.3511538

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Lautz, Jaclyn, Georgy Sankin, Fang Yuan and Pei Zhong (2010). Displacement of particles in microfluidics by laser-generated tandem bubbles. Appl Phys Lett, 97(18). p. 183701. 10.1063/1.3511538 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/3246.

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Scholars@Duke

Zhong

Pei Zhong

Professor in the Thomas Lord Department of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science

My research focuses on engineering and technology development with applications in the non-invasive or minimally invasive treatment of kidney stone disease via shock wave and laser lithotripsy, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and immunotherapy for cancer treatment, acoustic and optical cavitation, and ultrasound neuromodulation via sonogenetics. 

We are taking an integrated and translational approach that combines fundamental research with engineering and applied technology development to devise novel and enabling ultrasonic, optical, and mechanical tools for a variety of clinical applications. We are interested in shock wave/laser-fluid-bubble-solid interaction, and resultant mechanical and thermal fields that lead to material damage and removal.  We also investigate the stress response of biological cell and tissue induced by cavitation and ultrasound exposure, mediated through mechanosensitive ion channels, such as Piezo 1. Our research activities are primarily supported by NIH and through collaborations with the medical device industry.


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