Sexual victimization, fear of sexual powerlessness, and cognitive emotion dysregulation as barriers to sexual assertiveness in college women.

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2013-12

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Abstract

The current study examined sexual victimization and two barriers to young women's sexual assertiveness: fear of sexual powerlessness and cognitive emotion dysregulation. College women (N = 499) responded to surveys and indicated that fear of sexual powerlessness and, to a lesser extent, cognitive emotion dysregulation were barriers to sexual assertiveness. Compared with nonvictims, sexually victimized women had greater problems with sexual assertiveness, fear of sexual powerlessness, and cognitive emotion dysregulation. Among victims, fear of sexual powerlessness and emotion dysregulation interacted to impede sexual assertiveness. Findings support targeting identified barriers in interventions to improve sexual assertiveness and reduce risk for unwanted sexual experiences and sexual victimization.

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Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1177/1077801213517566

Publication Info

Zerubavel, Noga, and Terri L Messman-Moore (2013). Sexual victimization, fear of sexual powerlessness, and cognitive emotion dysregulation as barriers to sexual assertiveness in college women. Violence Against Women, 19(12). pp. 1518–1537. 10.1177/1077801213517566 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/11250.

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Scholars@Duke

Zerubavel

Noga Zerubavel

Assistant Consulting Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Noga Zerubavel, Ph.D. is a licensed psychologist and Assistant Consulting Professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University Medical Center, where she is involved in clinical education and research. She is involved in Trauma-informed Teaching and Learning in Education research project, supervises in Duke Family Studies, and participates in teaching for the clinical psychology predoctoral internship program. She is the former director of the Stress, Trauma, and Recovery Treatment (START) Clinic at Duke, where she led a trauma consultation team and supervised psychiatry residents and clinical psychology interns and fellows in trauma-informed psychotherapy. Dr. Zerubavel specializes in treatment of trauma survivors using empirically supported treatments, with an emphasis on contemporary CBTs and mindfulness-based psychotherapy. She also has expertise in addressing burnout and secondary traumatic stress, and individual and organizational practices for enhancing wellness and resilience. Dr. Zerubavel is active in providing trainings for mental health providers, social service administrators, and physicians and other health care providers.


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