Gene product 0.4 increases bacteriophage T7 competitiveness by inhibiting host cell division.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2013-11-11

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

107
views
45
downloads

Citation Stats

Abstract

Bacteriophages take over host resources primarily via the activity of proteins expressed early in infection. One of these proteins, produced by the Escherichia coli phage T7, is gene product (Gp) 0.4. Here, we show that Gp0.4 is a direct inhibitor of the E. coli filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z division protein. A chemically synthesized Gp0.4 binds to purified filamenting temperature-sensitive mutant Z protein and directly inhibits its assembly in vitro. Consequently, expression of Gp0.4 in vivo is lethal to E. coli and results in bacteria that are morphologically elongated. We further show that this inhibition of cell division by Gp0.4 enhances the bacteriophage's competitive ability. This division inhibition is thus a fascinating example of a strategy in bacteriophages to maximize utilization of their hosts' cell resources.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1073/pnas.1314096110

Publication Info

Kiro, Ruth, Shahar Molshanski-Mor, Ido Yosef, Sara L Milam, Harold P Erickson and Udi Qimron (2013). Gene product 0.4 increases bacteriophage T7 competitiveness by inhibiting host cell division. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, 110(48). 10.1073/pnas.1314096110 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/16465.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Erickson

Harold Paul Erickson

James B. Duke Distinguished Professor Emeritus

Recent research has been on cytoskeleton (eukaryotes and bacteria); a skirmish to debunk the irisin story; a reinterpretation of proposed multivalent binders of the coronavirus spike protein. I have also published an ebook on "Principles of Protein-Protein Association" suitable for a course module or individual learning.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.