Information processing without brains--the power of intercellular regulators in plants.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2010-04

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

242
views
371
downloads

Citation Stats

Attention Stats

Abstract

Plants exhibit different developmental strategies than animals; these are characterized by a tight linkage between environmental conditions and development. As plants have neither specialized sensory organs nor a nervous system, intercellular regulators are essential for their development. Recently, major advances have been made in understanding how intercellular regulation is achieved in plants on a molecular level. Plants use a variety of molecules for intercellular regulation: hormones are used as systemic signals that are interpreted at the individual-cell level; receptor peptide-ligand systems regulate local homeostasis; moving transcriptional regulators act in a switch-like manner over small and large distances. Together, these mechanisms coherently coordinate developmental decisions with resource allocation and growth.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1242/dev.034868

Publication Info

Busch, Wolfgang, and Philip N Benfey (2010). Information processing without brains--the power of intercellular regulators in plants. Development, 137(8). pp. 1215–1226. 10.1242/dev.034868 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/4171.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.