On the Concurrent Use of Self-System Therapy and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as Treatment for Depression.

Abstract

Objectives

Despite the growing use of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) as a treatment for unipolar depression, its typical effect sizes have been modest, and methodological and conceptual challenges remain regarding how to optimize its efficacy. Linking rTMS to a model of the neurocircuitry underlying depression and applying such a model to personalize the site of stimulation may improve the efficacy of rTMS. Recent developments in the psychology and neurobiology of self-regulation offer a conceptual framework for identifying mechanisms of action in rTMS for depression, as well as for developing guidelines for individualized rTMS treatment. We applied this framework to develop a multimodal treatment for depression by pairing self-system therapy (SST) with simultaneously administered rTMS delivered to an individually targeted region of dorsolateral prefrontal cortex identified via functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI).

Methods

In this proof-of-concept study, we examined the acceptability, feasibility, and preliminary efficacy of combining individually fMRI-targeted rTMS with SST. Using the format of a cognitive paired associative stimulation paradigm, the treatment was administered to 5 adults with unipolar depression in an open-label trial.

Results

The rTMS/SST combination was well tolerated, feasible, and acceptable. Preliminary evidence of efficacy also was promising. We hypothesized that both treatment modalities were targeting the same neural circuitry through cognitive paired associative stimulation, and observed changes in task-based fMRI were consistent with our model. These neural changes were directly related to improvements in depression severity.

Conclusions

The new combination treatment represents a promising exemplar for theory-based, individually targeted, multimodal intervention in mood disorders.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1097/yct.0000000000000545

Publication Info

Neacsiu, Andrada D, Bruce M Luber, Simon W Davis, Elisabeth Bernhardt, Timothy J Strauman and Sarah H Lisanby (2018). On the Concurrent Use of Self-System Therapy and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation as Treatment for Depression. The journal of ECT, 34(4). pp. 266–273. 10.1097/yct.0000000000000545 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/31190.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Neacsiu

Andrada Delia Neacsiu

Associate Professor in Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

I am a clinical psychologist with a primary interest in outpatient interventions for difficulties managing emotional experiences that interfere with well-being. As a clinician, I specialize in Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for adults who report a variety of mental health problems, including personality, mood, anxiety, eating, trauma, stress-related, adjustment, and impulse control disorders. My approach to psychotherapy includes working collaboratively with my patients to identify their unique life and therapy goals and implementing evidence-based interventions to achieve the identified goals. As an educator, I train clinicians nationally and teach graduate students, psychology and psychiatry residents in in how to effectively apply CBT and DBT in their clinical work. As a researcher, I focus on psychotherapy optimization and neuroscience-informed treatment development for emotion dysregulation. My research keeps me up to date with the latest evidence-based approaches to use in my clinical work, and my work with patients strongly influences the research that I do.  Outside of work, I enjoy traveling, gourmet food, nature adventures, and time with friends with family.

Davis

Simon Wilton Davis

Associate Professor in Neurology

My research centers around the use of structural and functional imaging measures to study the shifts in network architecture in the aging brain. I am specifically interested in changes in how changes in structural and functional connectivity associated with aging impact the semantic retrieval of word or fact knowledge. Currently this involves asking why older adults have particular difficulty in certain kinds of semantic retrieval, despite the fact that vocabularies and knowledge stores typically improve with age.

A second line of research involves asking questions about how this semantic system is organized in young adults, understanding which helps form a basis for asking questions about older adults. To what degree are these semantic retrieval processes lateralized? What cognitive factors affect this laterality? How are brain structures like the corpus callosum involved in mediating distributed activation patterns associated with semantic retrieval? 

Strauman

Timothy J. Strauman

Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience

FOR POTENTIAL STUDENTS (fall 2024 class): 

Dr. Timothy Strauman and Dr. Ann Brewster will be seeking to admit a student for Fall 2024 who will be an important member of their collaborative projects. Dr. Brewster is an intervention scientist and a faculty member in Duke’s Social Science Research Institute. The collaborative projects focus on creating, testing, and implementing school-based therapeutic and preventive interventions for adolescents at risk for negative academic and mental health outcomes. We are partnering with the Durham Public Schools as well as with other local school districts, and Dr. Brewster has extensive experience and expertise in developing the partnerships, working with community members, and the intervention process itself. We are especially interested in applicants with experience in community-based interventions, with interests in adolescence, and with knowledge and experience working with both behavioral and neuroimaging data.



Professor Strauman's research focuses on the psychological and neurobiological processes that enable self-regulation, conceptualized in terms of a cognitive/motivational perspective, as well as the relation between self-regulation and affect. Particular areas of emphasis include: (1) conceptualizing self-regulation in terms of brain/behavior motivational systems; (2) the role of self-regulatory cognitive processes in vulnerability to depression and other disorders; (3) the impact of treatments for depression, such as psychotherapy and medication, on self-regulatory function and dysfunction in depression; (4) how normative and non-normative socialization patterns influence the development of self-regulatory systems; (5) the contributory roles of self-regulation, affect, and psychopathology in determining immunologically-mediated susceptibility to illness; (6) development of novel multi-component treatments for depression targeting self-regulatory dysfunction; (7) utilization of brain imaging techniques to test hypotheses concerning self-regulation, including the nature and function of hypothetical regulatory systems and characterizing the breakdowns in self-regulation that lead to and accompany depression.
Lisanby

Sarah Hollingsworth Lisanby

Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Sarah Hollingsworth “Holly” Lisanby, MD, is an experienced translational researcher and innovator of neuromodulation technologies to study and treat psychiatric disorders. Dr. Lisanby is Director of the Division of Translational Research at NIMH, which funds research on the discovery of preventions, treatments, and cures for mental illness across the lifespan.  She is Founder and Director of the Noninvasive Neuromodulation Unit in the NIMH Intramural Research Program, a multi-disciplinary clinical research program specializing in the innovation of new brain stimulation tools to measure and modulate neuroplasticity to improve mental health.  Dr. Lisanby is former Chair of the Duke Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences, and JP Gibbons Endowed Professor at Duke University.  She founded and directed both the Duke and the Columbia University Divisions of Brain Stimulation, where she built interdisciplinary research programs specializing in the convergence of Psychiatry, Neuroscience and Engineering. She co-led the NIH BRAIN Initiative Team focused on large-scale neural recording and modulation devices. Dr. Lisanby has been principal investigator on a series of federally funded grants on the development of novel neuromodulation technologies, including the rational design of magnetic and electrical seizure therapies.  Her team pioneered magnetic seizure therapy (MST) as a novel depression treatment from the stages of animal testing, first-in-human, and international clinical trials.  She led a series of studies involving transcranial magnetic stimulation, electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), MST, vagus nerve stimulation, and deep brain stimulation. She has received numerous international recognitions, including the Max Hamilton Memorial Prize of the Collegium Internationale Neuro-Psychopharmacologicum, the Gerald Klerman Award from the National Depression and Manic Depression Association, and the Eva King Killam Research Award from the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology.  She has been a member of the NIMH Board of Scientific Counselors. Dr. Lisanby served on the FDA Neurological Devices Advisory Panel and has held key leadership positions with numerous professional associations, including serving as President for the Association for Convulsive Therapy/International Society of Neurostimulation, and the International Society for Transcranial Stimulation, and Chair of the American Psychiatric Association Task Force to Revise the Practice on ECT. 


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.