Development of hemispheric specialization for lexical pitch-accent in Japanese infants.

Loading...
Thumbnail Image

Date

2010-11

Journal Title

Journal ISSN

Volume Title

Repository Usage Stats

304
views
1252
downloads

Citation Stats

Abstract

Infants' speech perception abilities change through the first year of life, from broad sensitivity to a wide range of speech contrasts to becoming more finely attuned to their native language. What remains unclear, however, is how this perceptual change relates to brain responses to native language contrasts in terms of the functional specialization of the left and right hemispheres. Here, to elucidate the developmental changes in functional lateralization accompanying this perceptual change, we conducted two experiments on Japanese infants using Japanese lexical pitch-accent, which changes word meanings with the pitch pattern within words. In the first behavioral experiment, using visual habituation, we confirmed that infants at both 4 and 10 months have sensitivities to the lexical pitch-accent pattern change embedded in disyllabic words. In the second experiment, near-infrared spectroscopy was used to measure cortical hemodynamic responses in the left and right hemispheres to the same lexical pitch-accent pattern changes and their pure tone counterparts. We found that brain responses to the pitch change within words differed between 4- and 10-month-old infants in terms of functional lateralization: Left hemisphere dominance for the perception of the pitch change embedded in words was seen only in the 10-month-olds. These results suggest that the perceptual change in Japanese lexical pitch-accent may be related to a shift in functional lateralization from bilateral to left hemisphere dominance.

Department

Description

Provenance

Citation

Published Version (Please cite this version)

10.1162/jocn.2009.21377

Publication Info

Sato, Yutaka, Yuko Sogabe and Reiko Mazuka (2010). Development of hemispheric specialization for lexical pitch-accent in Japanese infants. J Cogn Neurosci, 22(11). pp. 2503–2513. 10.1162/jocn.2009.21377 Retrieved from https://hdl.handle.net/10161/4622.

This is constructed from limited available data and may be imprecise. To cite this article, please review & use the official citation provided by the journal.

Scholars@Duke

Mazuka

Reiko Mazuka

Research Professor in the Department of Psychology and Neuroscience

Language acquisition and psycholinguistics. In particular, she is interested in the development and consequences of acquiring very different types of languages. The research has taken a cross-linguistic approach between English and Japanese, and her current research involves the following three areas: (1) study of sentence comprehension strategies by adult and child speakers of Japanese and English; (2) cross- linguistic study of infants' speech perception; and (3) influence of acquiring language specific categories on cognition.


Unless otherwise indicated, scholarly articles published by Duke faculty members are made available here with a CC-BY-NC (Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial) license, as enabled by the Duke Open Access Policy. If you wish to use the materials in ways not already permitted under CC-BY-NC, please consult the copyright owner. Other materials are made available here through the author’s grant of a non-exclusive license to make their work openly accessible.